Tag Archives: Stanier

No smoke without fire

How  very transitional, a steam engine coming to the rescue of a failed diesel, or even been given the job of piloting one. However, in this instance the diesel is there to alleviate the fire risk caused by this summer’s drought; though as can be seen, No.45699 Galatea was putting in a little effort too. And, if one can be thankful for small mercies, at least the diesel almost blends in; unlike the hideous blue one with the Union Jack, which sticks out further than a sore thumb.

No.45699 Galatea has just hit the 1:100 gradient, you can see that change about 4 coaches back, as she powers across Birkett common towards Birkett tunnel. This stretch of the line has, over the years, seen some memorable test running; during 1937 it was the turn of Leeds crew Driver W. North and Fireman H. George of Holbeck who with engine No.5660 Rooke completed the Carlisle – Leeds run of 113 miles in 115mins 38sec.  On that test run the section from Carlisle to Aisgill summit, a distance of 48.4 miles, was made in 48 mins 36 sec, the load was 305 tons.

On the marginally more difficult north bound working this same engine and crew made the Leeds – Carlisle run in 117 mins. In his book the “Jubilees of the LMS”, John Clay, (from which this information has been taken), notes that on the banks the engine was worked at 35 – 40% cut-off and full regulator. He also comments that the fireman was to be commended as there were no reports of steaming problems. Nice to see the fireman being given his dues.

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If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

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50 years down the line

Saturday August 11th 2018 and No.45690 Leander  clears Shotlock Tunnel with the re-run of 1T57 aka ‘Waverley’ in real time. No.45690 Leander was one of three engines working over the Settle – Carlisle line on this auspicious occasion. All three were diesel assisted because of the fire hazard brought about by the drought. In this photo the load was being shared in what seemed to be 50 – 50.

By contrast, in this shot of No.45699 Galatea with the ‘up’ Cumbrian Mountain Express, at Birkett common, where No.45699 Galatea was putting in a little more than 50% with matching clag and a feather at the safety valves. And then there was No.60009 Union of South Africa – perhaps the less said the better.Some of you might have noticed Steam Age Daydreams has been missing from Facebook – it will not be returning. Please feel free to let other SADD readers know that in future all updates will appear only here.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Crewe – August 1958

My sister-in-law recently unearthed one of her Dad’s old spotters note books and, not unsurprisingly, handed it to me. On August 2nd 1958 he travelled from Leeds to Crewe for a day’s spotting and shed bashing. There are close to 300 numbers recorded, 12 Coronations and 3 Princess Royals, the ‘preserved’ No.46115 Scots Guardsman was one of 24 Scots and there was a supporting cast of Patriots both rebuilt and original(ish) served with a garnish of Jubilees.

There are also one or two notables in the un-named ‘also rans’ category; the now preserved Black 5s No.45110, of 15 Guineas fame, and No.45305, which was ‘preserved’ by the scrapman who bought her, Mr. Draper of Hull, were both there on the day, along with the 8F No.48188. No.48188 was the engine involved in the accident at Chapel-en-le-Frith, in February 1957, in which driver John Axon died whilst trying to stop his runaway train and avert casualties. For his bravery, in staying at the controls of his stricken engine, driver Axon was posthumously awarded the George Cross, in May 1957, in 1978, his medal was donated to the National Railway Museum.

Three days after the Crewe visit, on August 5th, the notebook records a visit to York, only 60 engines this time, though one of them was the now preserved Fairburn 2-6-4T No.42073. There are also some ‘wish we still had them’ amongst the engines present, including a Midland design 3 cylinder Compound No.41101, former P2 No.60502 Earl Marischal, and lesser lights like K3s, B16s, and, of course, V2s. Can we please have our ‘Green Arrow’ back mister!!

No.48188 did not escape the chop, the photo shows classmate 48624 with the same kind of a loose coupled working that 48188 was on, on that fatefull day in 1957.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The dying of the light

Earlier this week I was listening to Richard Burton reciting Dylan Thomas’ poem, ‘Rage against the dying of the light’. A poem which could, in so many ways, be a leitmotiv for the railway preservation movement. That great engineman Norman McKillop titled his history of ASLEF, the footplatemen’s union, ‘The Lighted Flame’ a flame the preservationists have succeded in keeping alight ever since they revived the near extinct  one, at Talyllyn, almost 60 years ago now.

Such was the rage against the dying of the light of the steam locomotive that, over the ensuing years, the achievements of those who saught to keep the flames burning are mind-boggling. What began as the ‘perpetuation’ of the seven mile, narrow gauge, Talyllyn Railway, in a remote corner of Wales, is now a substantial sector of the Country’s tourism industry. Steam hauled main line tours like the ‘Great Britain’, seen above, with the city of Dundee in the backdrop and scheduled daily services, such as the Jacobite, are no longer the novelties they once were.

That diminutive quarry railway in Wales provided the inspiration for a thousand more preservation schemes large and small, branch lines, main lines, bridges, rolling stock, S&T equipment,  all the apparatus of an operational railway was rescued and what they couldn’t find or repair they made anew – up to and including a replica of an LNER A1 class Pacific. The sums of money and volunteer man hours are even more mind-boggling, hundreds of millions of pounds and literally billions of man hours – all of which is, of course, on going.

The photograph shows Black 5 No.45407, carrying a wreath on the smokebox door, passing Peace Hill Farm with the Dundee – Edinburgh leg of the GBII Tour.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Party poopers

I remember visting Keighley in 1965, whilst I was still a BR fireman at Nine Elms, and seeing No.69523, a little later she became No.4744, later still No.1744, as she is now, sat in the yard at Haworth along with No.51218. One of my chums lived in Ingrow, so I got all the local gossip too. I don’t think any of us, at the time, ever imagined the line would become the attraction it has – I doubt any of us imagined being fifty, let alone seeing the railway it all became – 50 years on.

Not a picture from 50 years ago but, another of the very earliest arrivals and a personal favourite, sadly not in action at the party.

No.78022 when she was fitted wih the Giesl ejector, a short lived experiment. No.78022 is soon to be returned to traffic, minus the Giesl.

No. 957 aka No.52044 and ‘The Green Dragon’ of Railway Children fame, another very early arrival – 1965.

Scanned from a slide, the train engine is old stalwart, the 8F No.48431, which arrived in 1972 and first ran in 1975.

And here’s the real 5775 piloting No.48431, a scan from an old black and white print.

Sir Berkeley was another of the 1965 arrivals – I do have pics of her at Haworth but not scanned. This shot shows her at East Tanfield some years ago.

The Ex-Haydock Foundry loco – ‘Bellerophon’ was an early arrival, in 1966, though she didn’t return to steam until late in 1985.

Last, but by no means least is another old favourite which didn’t make it to the party, Jinty No.47279 – a class of engine I made my first ever footplate ride on; age 14, and a trip along the leeds Fireclay branch from Farnley Junction.

This is not an exhaustive list of the engines which have over the years been a part of the K&WVR line, rather a little snapshot of some of the old favourites which didn’t make the 50th Birthday Bash.

All that remains is to say top marks to all the volunteeers and everyone else who, over the last 50 years have, through thick and thin, made the K&WVR what it is today. And, for the splendid 50th Birthday Celebrations of the last 8 days.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Summer Special

July only – enjoy Gricing for less. From July 1st to 31st the Ebook version of Gricing is on special offer at just £3.99

Here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children-ebook/dp/B011D1WBWY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

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Hot Scot

Today’s visit to the K&WVR 50th Celebrations, provided a little addition to the usual drama of steam locomotives hard at work, there was a trackside fire at Oxenhope. Not a huge affair but, large enough to warrant the attention of the local fire brigade – with a substantial delay to services until it was all dampend down. Not quite what you want with crowds of people, in gala mood, in baking hot conditions stuck, on the train.

With nothing happening at Oxenhope we took the opportunity to move down to Ingrow, which is where we see No.46100 Royal Scot.  Now, you could be forgiven for thinking that she is hurtling through the station on her non-stop run to Oxenhope but, you’d be wrong. No.46100 Royal Scot is moving, and the lamps would indicate an express, however, in this photo she’s the tail of the top and tail working and, so far as I recall, the lamp(s) should be a single one, bottom middle, and red during the hours of darkness, in fog, or falling snow.

Moving on – the Thames Clyde Express was a regular duty, for many years, for the Royal Scots and would have been a regular sight for railway enthusiasts in and around Keighley during the 50s and early 60s, before the A3s stole some of their thunder. However, for 3 days No.46100 Royal Scot is the star attraction – and no more line side fires – please.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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A little 8F – ing

Double-entende and railway slang have much in common and there’s no shortage of words and phrases from the railway lexicon to be found in common parlance – from a desire to ‘polish those buffers’ to ‘hitting’ them, and ‘building up a head of steam’, well you get the intention. I kept hearing an LMS whistle, blowing on the breeze but, until the 8F burst from Shotlock Tunnel I had know idea which of the possible locomotives it was, though I did know it wasn’t British India Line, or something LNER.

My previous visit to the Settle – Carlisle line was two weeks ago, when No.45690 Leander was ‘running out of puff’ and, as a result, behind schedule. Today, however, No.48151 was a few minutes ahead of time and ‘going like a train’. Speaking of which, that master of innuendo George Formby used to do a little number called the ‘Wigan Boat Express’ – an entirely fictional train service. A couple of lines will serve to give you the gist: “A chap one day with a girl got gay, I saw them both caress. She got what for in the corridor on the Wigan Boat Express.” (Formby, G.) Moving swiftly on, this song could not have been written about a train liason today, what with the open saloon and a distinct lack of corridors. Perhaps, this is the moment to draw a veil over the steamy proceedings.

The photo shws No.48151 emerging from Shotlock Tunnel, close to Aisgill summit, with the ‘Dalesman’ Chester – Carlisle excursion.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

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The Black 5’s turn

Today, June 16th, it is 70 years since Black 5 No.45253 worked from Manchester to Marylebone with the return working of her ‘Locomotive Exchange Trial’ test run, having worked North on the 15th. Later in the year Canon Roger Lloyd penned a piece for the Spectator magazine, on BR’s first year, in which he covers the trials.  Lloyd refers to B1s, as ‘Antelopes’ and Bulleid Pacifics as ‘Southern Streamliners’, quaint terms to modern ears. The good reverend suggests that the B1s were highly thought of, but doesn’t mention the Black 5s at all, though he is rather fond of the Royal Scots, which he considers to be the most handsome design.

Lloyd also questions why the Castles, V2s, Nelsons, and Jubilees were not included in the testing programme. More importantly from a travellers point of view, perhaps, he writes about how services are being restored after the ravages of WWII, blaming the lack of steel allocated for railway use for the shortages of sleeping and restaurant coaches before remarking that most of the ‘named’ trains had been restored and the cross country services were also – ‘vastly improved’. The article, which is titled “BR’s First Year”, paints a generally favourable picture of the progress made by BR during its first year of operations.

However, there is a hint of things to come with talk of country station closures, or reducing the number of stops to speed up services. For me though, the little gem in the piece concerned men I knew. Lloyd talks about the Southern crew, (Driver George Swain and Fireman Bert Hooker), working over the Highland route to Inverness with WC Class 4-6-2 No.34006 Bude. His comment was that they needed an interpreter as much as they needed a pilotman – having fired on the Southern and lived in Scotland for many years – I know exactly what he means.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Jubilee close up

My previous post, about the proliferation of Jubilees in the Leeds area, drew a number of comments, one of which was, ‘how did they compare with the Black 5s’.  Today I had a flick through the latest Steam Railway, whilst standing in the supermarket, and in the Main Line running feature, Lo’ and behold, was an article  on No.45699 Galatea. I didn’t get chance to read the article, save that it mentioned that No.45699 Galatea had put in an epic performance and the engine she was being compared against wasn’t the Black 5 but a ‘Scot’.

My own work on the Jubilees is such that making a real comparison with the Black 5 is a little unfair. A dozen runs and half of them I was only riding out, while I was still just a cleaner, isn’t exactly ‘experience’. The longest trip I made on one was from Wakefield to Blackpool and back There were crews, at Farnley Jct, who often commented they’d as soon have a Black 5 as a Jubilee.  Having only been a fireman all I can say is that the Black 5 was a more forgiving engine. The Jubilees needed more careful firing, if you got too much fire down the front, under the brick arch, they would go sick on you. And trying to use fire irons, keeping them within the confines of the cab, when you’re on the move, is a risky and tricky business.

When first introduced the Jubilees did have a reputation as indifferent performers; and the level of superheating was considered the culprit.  Time and energy was put into improving their performance and, in 1937, No.(4)5684 Jutland was fitted with a Kylchap double-chimney and blast pipe Despite improvements in coal consumption, it was remved after a year. Several others were fitted with a standard  double-chimney only to have them later removed, a few did keep them though including the preserved No.45596 Bahamas.  However, it was changes to the chimney and blast pipe which were, eventually, credited with improving their steaming capabilities.

And you don’t create epic runs if you’re short of steam.

The photo shows Ex-LMS Jubilee No.(4)5690 Leander pulling away from Loughborough  Central  Station, on the GCR, with a TPO recreation.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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