Tag Archives: Stanier

The Black 5’s turn

Today, June 16th, it is 70 years since Black 5 No.45253 worked from Manchester to Marylebone with the return working of her ‘Locomotive Exchange Trial’ test run, having worked North on the 15th. Later in the year Canon Roger Lloyd penned a piece for the Spectator magazine, on BR’s first year, in which he covers the trials.  Lloyd refers to B1s, as ‘Antelopes’ and Bulleid Pacifics as ‘Southern Streamliners’, quaint terms to modern ears. The good reverend suggests that the B1s were highly thought of, but doesn’t mention the Black 5s at all, though he is rather fond of the Royal Scots, which he considers to be the most handsome design.

Lloyd also questions why the Castles, V2s, Nelsons, and Jubilees were not included in the testing programme. More importantly from a travellers point of view, perhaps, he writes about how services are being restored after the ravages of WWII, blaming the lack of steel allocated for railway use for the shortages of sleeping and restaurant coaches before remarking that most of the ‘named’ trains had been restored and the cross country services were also – ‘vastly improved’. The article, which is titled “BR’s First Year”, paints a generally favourable picture of the progress made by BR during its first year of operations.

However, there is a hint of things to come with talk of country station closures, or reducing the number of stops to speed up services. For me though, the little gem in the piece concerned men I knew. Lloyd talks about the Southern crew, (Driver George Swain and Fireman Bert Hooker), working over the Highland route to Inverness with WC Class 4-6-2 No.34006 Bude. His comment was that they needed an interpreter as much as they needed a pilotman – having fired on the Southern and lived in Scotland for many years – I know exactly what he means.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Jubilee close up

My previous post, about the proliferation of Jubilees in the Leeds area, drew a number of comments, one of which was, ‘how did they compare with the Black 5s’.  Today I had a flick through the latest Steam Railway, whilst standing in the supermarket, and in the Main Line running feature, Lo’ and behold, was an article  on No.45699 Galatea. I didn’t get chance to read the article, save that it mentioned that No.45699 Galatea had put in an epic performance and the engine she was being compared against wasn’t the Black 5 but a ‘Scot’.

My own work on the Jubilees is such that making a real comparison with the Black 5 is a little unfair. A dozen runs and half of them I was only riding out, while I was still just a cleaner, isn’t exactly ‘experience’. The longest trip I made on one was from Wakefield to Blackpool and back There were crews, at Farnley Jct, who often commented they’d as soon have a Black 5 as a Jubilee.  Having only been a fireman all I can say is that the Black 5 was a more forgiving engine. The Jubilees needed more careful firing, if you got too much fire down the front, under the brick arch, they would go sick on you. And trying to use fire irons, keeping them within the confines of the cab, when you’re on the move, is a risky and tricky business.

When first introduced the Jubilees did have a reputation as indifferent performers; and the level of superheating was considered the culprit.  Time and energy was put into improving their performance and, in 1937, No.(4)5684 Jutland was fitted with a Kylchap double-chimney and blast pipe Despite improvements in coal consumption, it was remved after a year. Several others were fitted with a standard  double-chimney only to have them later removed, a few did keep them though including the preserved No.45596 Bahamas.  However, it was changes to the chimney and blast pipe which were, eventually, credited with improving their steaming capabilities.

And you don’t create epic runs if you’re short of steam.

The photo shows Ex-LMS Jubilee No.(4)5690 Leander pulling away from Loughborough  Central  Station, on the GCR, with a TPO recreation.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Jubes

When I think back to Leeds City Station, in the late 1950s, more than anything I associate it with the ‘Jubilees’.  They have woven in and out of my life ever since. The Jubes came and went from Leeds to all corners of the sprawling LMS. On the Scottish services one would arrive from St.Pancras, in the south, and another would back down  to work the train north to Carlisle and Glasgow. The ones which came in from Birmingham and Bristol would be replaced by a V2 or an A3, if the train was one going forwards to York and Newcastle; a Fairburn or Fowler 2-6-4 tank was the usual motive power, if it was a service which terminated at Bradford Forster Square.

The Newcastle – Liverpools or Hull – Liverpools would run in behind A3s, V2s, B1s, and B16s from the North or East, and depart for Manchester and Liverpool behind a Jube, sometimes double-headed. For a period of several months in 1962 the Jubes working these services, or the famous ‘Red Bank vans’, the returning Manchester – Newcastle paper train, would, if they were Farnley Jct. engines, have been cleaned by yours truly.

In 1962 55C Farnley Jct. had 4 Jubilees on the allocation, 55A Holbeck, however, had no less than 18 and some of that stud remained active to the very end. No.45675  Hardy, No.45694 Bellerophon and  the very last to go, No.45562 Alberta, were all Holbeck engines at the end of the 1950s. No.45562 had been allocated to Holbeck in 1948 and for all but a brief interregnum at – yes, 55C Farnley Jct.  in 1964 / 65, it was where she remained until withdrawn in November 1967: she was cut up at Cashmores in May 1968. No. 45694 Bellerophon, along with another of the Holbeck entourage, No.45739 Ulster were, for a short spell in 1966/7, shedded at 56A Wakefield.  And during this period I worked on No.45694 Bellerophon, taking a ‘Miner’s Welfare’ trip to Blackpool and back, as I mentioned in a previous blog.

The photo shows No.45699 Galatea, a long time Bristol (Barrow Rd.) engine, at the north end of the short Shotlock Tunnel, approaching the summit of Aisgill. She is working the ‘Hadrian’ – Norwich – Carlisle and return.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Bit of a mis-match

On the 1st of June 1948 Black 5 No.45253 left St. Pancras, bound for Manchester, on the first of her runs in the Mixed Traffic section of the 1948 Locomotibe Exchange Trials. The other locomotives in her pool were the B1 No.61251 Oliver Bury and the Bulleid West Country Class No.34005 Barnstaple, which was crewed by Nine Elms pair, George James driving, and George Reynolds firing.

During my own footplate service I worked on all three types; and in the case of No.34005 Barnstaple I worked on the actual engine. All I can say is that putting the Black 5 and B1 in the same category as a Bulleid ‘light’ Pacific was a bit of a mis-match, to put it mildly. And it wasn’t the only mis-match. The Southern engines were coupled to LMS tenders during their running on the Midland and the LMS  engines were coupled to ‘Austerity’ tenders, when doing their turn on Southern metals. This was all brought about by of the lack of troughs on the Southern which meant that the tenders on the Southern engines didn’t have scoops.

However, despite these minor issues, the performance of the selected crews was highly professional, under what must have been challenging conditions, on a railway still recovering from the ravages of 5 years of warfare. And not just the hardware of the railway landscape and the p-way, but the railwaymen themselves who had been working on the footplate, in the stations, goods yards, and signal boxes, or on the p-way throughout the hostilities. To even be in a position, after less than 3 years since the war’s end, and only 4 months after the formation of British Railways, to organise and run the Locomotive Exchanges was, perhaps, miraculous.

The photo shows No.44806, now out of service, passing Esk Valley, on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, with a Grosmont – Pickering service.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Waggling signals

Nearing the summit at Aisgill, with the Fellsman, is Ex-LMS Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No.45699 Galatea; she looked and sounded on fine form as she swept round the curves between Lunds viaduct and Shotlock Tunnel. The photo is taken from the top of the tunnel and you can just make out the footbridge, over the line at Lunds, on the left edge.

I was joined on my lofty perch by a chap from Barrow and we passed a pleasant half hour chatting about railways and railwaymen; a conversation which produced a wonderful little anecdote about a spot of ‘on duty’ lubrication for the crew of the Tebay banker.

When he was younger, in the steam era,  he was friendly with some of the crews who worked at Tebay, who told him a tale of ‘after hours’ in, I think he said, the Junction Hotel.  They would cross over the foot bridge, by the shed, and make their way up to the pub and into the back room, which had a large bay window, from which could be seen the very tall signals, at the end of the platform at Tebay Station.

The standing arrangement was that, if an approaching train was in need of a banker, for the climb to Shap summit, the Bobby would waggle the signal arms up and down a couple of times and the crew would down their beer and head for the shed. In the tale, the hapless crew get back on the footplate only to find the fire half dead and not a lot of steam. It goes almost without saying that any banking assistance that was provided was minimal to say the least!

Today any railwayman having a few pints, in such a fashion, and whilst on duty would be sacked – when folk say, ‘it was different back then’, really aren’t kidding.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

The ‘starred’ 8F

Tuesday’s Dalesman was again in the hands of the ‘starred’ 8F No.48151, and she is seen here northbound, at Langcliffe, just a couple of miles beyond Settle Junction.  Built at Crewe in 1942 No.48151 spent her first seven years at Grangemouth before becoming a Canklow engine in 1949, where, apart from a brief spell at Wellingborough, she remained until 1962 – I very much doubt that she saw much by way of passenger duties at either location. Somewhat more surprising is that ‘in preservation’ she has worked freight trains, a stone hopper train from  Ribblehead quarry over the S&C to Carlisle and at Tunstead quarry during a short spell on loan there.

Canklow, 19C later 41D, (Rotherham), opened in 1875 and closed to steam in 1965 and the nearest I could find to a passenger engine, on the books, was a ‘Flying Pig’ No.43037 which spent quite some time there in the 1950s and 60s. At Grangemouth No.48151 would have been rubbing shoulders with WD 2-10-0s and ancient Ex-Caledonian Railway Drummond, Pickersgill, and McIntosh 0-6-0s, like the 1899 vintage, McIntosh 3F, No.828, (BR No.57566), which is still running on the Strathspey Railway.

Grangemouth was one of the Scottish sheds I visited during a round Scotland track and shed bash in 1964, not the most accessible spot to reach using public transport, like Thornton Jct., which was another one on the list we visited. I had my one and only footplate trip on an A4 during this tour, riding on No.60026 Miles Beevor from Aberdeen up to Stonehaven – a very different experience from the Bulleid Pacifics I was working on, out of Waterloo. Quite what the Aberdeen men made of me I don’t know, the fireman was old enough to be my dad and the driver my grandad!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

“Sooty”

The thing about being a fireman on a big engine, like the Bulleids or any of the other Pacifics, is that once the lights are green and the guard drops his flag, there’s no hiding place.  On your shoulders rests the difference between ‘rockets flying’ and ‘stopped for a blow-up’. Yes it’s team work and if things are not going well a decent mate will coast where he can and use no more steam than he has to where he can’t.

The number of variables is greater than you imagine, a cross-head wind, for instance, makes an appreciable difference to the amount of power needed to overcome that resistance – even straight or curving track alters the equation. Less esoteric but, equally important are; how long the engine had been in service since the last boiler washout and were the ash pans and smokebox cleaned out properly when the engine was last disposed. And of course the usual suspects, the type and quality of coal in the tender and how clinkered the firebed was. A bad day at the office inevitably involved a combination of these factors – if you had them all, you really should have ‘stayed in bed’!

On top of the factors already mentioned different classes of engines respond in different ways to  the level of the fire and the style of firing as well as to different styles of driving. The class 5 Standards, for example, didn’t always steam that well if pulled up to less than 25% cut-off – they needed that blast, that pull on the fire to make them steam. The Stanier Jubilees were very similar and they didn’t like a lot of fire down the front under the brick arch either. Firing isn’t simply a matter of chucking coal through a hole.

I haven’t even mentioned route knowledge or type of service being worked and already there’s quite a bit to be thinking about. There’s firing to a pattern or to the bright spots and keeping it all light and bright – on some engines this might be the only way, it is the ‘copy book’ way. On the other hand you might just ‘cob ’em up’ and sit back while it burns through!

By now you’re probably wondering about “Sooty” – well Sooty was my regular mate in 3link at 70A, driver Eric ‘sooty’ Saunders. A top bloke to work with, who not only taught me a great deal about how to fire the Bulleids but, gave me the chance to drive them too – at speed out on the main line. By the end of a shift the pair of us were usually covered in grime, however, this isn’t where the nickname came from. He was “Sooty” because when he wasn’t driving steam engines,  his part-time job involved travelling around Feltham on his motor bike and sidecar – cleaning folks chimneys!

No.35018 British India Line, an engine ‘Sooty’ and I worked on regularly during the 60s, is seen her at Helwith Bridge, on the Settle to Carlisle Line, with the Dalesman Rail Tour.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Boys and the black stuff

Just short of 30 years ago I was writing a fortnightly column in the now defunct Steam Railway News, a fortnightly broadsheet newspaper covering preservation and heritage railways. The by-line for the column was Clag and Rockets and I had pretty much free rein to write what I liked, as I do now. The most controversial piece I penned was about the Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway and the proposal to bury huge amounts of nuclear waste very close by.

Weird, I know, but I have this thing about synchronicity and today I had one of those kinds of things. When I wrote the ‘Laal Ratty’ piece Steam Railway News was being published by East Lancashire Publications and I had to be fairly persuasive to get it into print. Today, I discovered that one of the people I was involved with, in the production of SRN, had previously lived  in Bentham. During a very brief spell as a fireman at Holbeck, I worked on just one passenger duty, a late afternoon Leeds to Morecambe service, first stop Keighley and then pretty much every station on the ‘little North Western” including Bentham. The engine was a Black 5, a locomotive for which the term Utilitarian, might have been written – Jeremy Bentham was the ‘Godfather’ of Utilitarianism. Basically – “it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong” J. Bentham

However, this knowledge should be tempered by this comment he made about his conceptual prison, ‘The Panopticon’  ‘he described the Panopticon prison as, “a mill for grinding rogues honest”.  And it is here that weirdness kicks in; the chap from SRN is about to take up a post as a prison chaplin. When I began writing Clag & Rockets for SRN I had just finished my degree in Philosophy, in which Bentham and his ideas were a feature. And moments before I read about the Bentham connection I was wondering how to persuade my good lady that a trip to Laal Ratty, to see Synolda & Count Louis double-heading, is a wonderful journey through Lakeland – even if we do have to be up at 6a.m. for a 3 hour car trip. I’d even been on Google maps checking out the route! Must be something in the ether.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Mrs Dale’s Diary

The everyday diary of simple Gricing folk. Tuesday 1st May, May Day, and the first of the season’s Dalesman is spotted alongside the river Ribble, at Helwith Bridge. The train had arrived early at Hellifield for the engine change but, was, for reasons unknown, 12 late leaving and still 12 late when she passed. Given the nice feather flying I’m guessing the delay wasn’t caused by a shortage of steam.

The Dalesman runs until September 4th and twice a week sometimes in the summer, throw in the Fellsmen and the Cumbrian Mountain Express and the Waverley on the weekends and it all adds up to a lot of trips, uphill and down dale to see some of the action. When you start totting it all up and that’s just the S&C, there are the Scarborough runs, runs up the ECML, round the Surrey Hills, the Dorset Coast, the Cathedrals Express, and the Jacobite, not to mention one offs and private charters. That’s a lot of volunteers to support all that activity. Equally important is it requires quite a lot of ‘traction trained’ drivers to cover all these tours.

All this activity requires tenderfulls of coal and water, and this latter has to be delivered by road tanker to prearranged stops along the route of the tour. What happens if the tanker gets stuck on the motorway or has a breakdown – it really would be ‘call the fire brigade’ – or put the fire out. Anyway, on that cheerful note, let’s hope all goes well; and enjoy No.48151 in God’s, almost, green acres.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

56 years ago today

56 years ago today I began work with BR, at a shed, where I cleaned and fired engines just like the one in this photo. Unfortunately none of them survived ‘the great purge’. However, one that did survive was a fairly frequent visitor, when she was based at Stockport, No.45596 Bahamas; one of a handful of the Jubilee Class which were fitted with a double chimney.

Like the engine this photograph, No. 45690 Leander, No.45596 Bahamas is soon to be back in action, after lengthy overhaul. Just as some of my very first associations were with the Jubilees so were some of my last. There were very few passenger turns at Wakefield, where I ended my BR service, apart from a few jobs working the Bradford portions of London – Leeds services from Wakefield Westgate to Bradford Exchange, the only others, at the time, were ‘excursions’ for Rugby / Football matches and trips to the seaside.

My very last trip on a Jubilee was with a trip to Blackpool and back with a train load of miners, the details of which were the subject of an earlier post. Sadly, none of the engines I worked on at Farnley and at Wakefield survived, however, a goodly number of those I worked on at Nine Elms did; and a week on Friday I hope to see one of them, No.35018 British India Line, having a run over the S&C. I haven’t seen her in the flesh since she was withdrawn, over 50 years ago – quite looking forward to Friday 20th. My BR days migh have ended in 1968 but my attachment to those dim and distant days did not.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Please like & share:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather