Tag Archives: Pullman

Tea and buns Worth

43924damloopI always knew them as ‘Derby Fours’ and I know some folk called them ‘Duck Sixes’, but one of my old railway pals, an Ex-Manningham fireman, later a driver at Gateshead, always referred to these engines as ‘night fighters’; the reason why escapes me. Sadly, he’s no longer with us so I can’t ask him to refresh my memory. ( If any one reading this knows the answer – please do tell.)

Speaking of ‘night fighters’, during WWII the LMS introduced ‘Iron Rations’ – the iron rations consisted of spoonfuls of tea and sugar for men who were stranded, by enemy air raids, away from their home depots. However, these rations weren’t  a generous offer, in the ‘Dunkirk spirit’,  made by th LMS to their footplate crew – they charged for them and turned a profit; about 300% on the tea and over 1300% on the sugar, which I’m sure left a bad taste. (Source: J A Carter, Chairman, Willesden  LDC 1941, Locomotive Journal)

In the Pullman coaches, behind No.43924, the passengers are, no doubt, enjoying ‘cream teas’ and in somewhat different circumstances, no iron rations for them. I have to admit I’ve enjoyed a ‘cream tea’ myself, on the K&WVR, riding in the ‘Old Gentleman’s coach’ – great fun.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing:  Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

By Amazon Customer on 17 Mar. 2016

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase

“Not a murder mystery, but one that I found hard to put down. One of the best additions to my collection of books about railways.”

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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I see no Railway Children

43924oakworthclagOakworth, a station immoratalised in the “Railway Children”, looking every bit the ‘well kept country station’ with the tubs of flowers on the platform and a host of golden daffodils alongside the trackbed. Cream teas are being served in the Pullman coaches, being hauled by ‘Derby 4’ No.43924. Rather fittingly, Pullman coaches and luxury travel were introduced to Britain, by the Midland Railway, in 1874 – the first coach, which arrived in kit form from the USA, was named “Midland”.

The sulphurous clag rolling from the chimney of No.43924 seems almost anachronistic in a scene of bucolic Britain coupled with the lavish luxury of  a cream tea, all doilies and white weskits, served whilst riding in a Pullman carriage. No.43924, a classic Midland Railway goods engine, was unlikely ever to have hauled a Pullman train, except, maybe, as empty stock. As for the Virol, advertised on the enameled sign on the platform, I had spoonfuls of the stuff shoved down my neck as a nipper, not sure if it improved ‘my health and vitality’, but I have lasted longer than the Virol, which seems to have vanished around 1980!

I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing: Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

By Amazon Customer on 17 Mar. 2016

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase

Not a murder mystery, but one that I found hard to put down. One of the best additions to my collection of books about railways.

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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It’s not Yorkshire and it’s not a Pullman

1306yorkspull

The Leeds and Bradford business traffic was an important consideration for the Great Northern and later the London & North Eastern Railway. Fast comfortable trains departed Leeds and Bradford to take ‘people’ to ‘town’ in time to do ‘business’ before getting them back to Yorkshire in time for G&Ts. In 1935 the Yorkshire Pullman, which had portions for Halifax, Bradford, and Hull, left Leeds central Station at 11.14am, arriving in Kings Cross at 2.40pm. The down train left Kings Cross at 4.45pm arriving in Leeds at 8.13 pm,  the  Hull portion, which detached at Doncaster,  arrived at 8.15 pm.

One of my old school chums went to work, stewarding, on the Pullmans, when he left school.  I enjoyed a couple of free dinners on the Yorkshire Pullman, traveling back to Leeds to see the folks, when I was working at Nine Elms MPD, during the early 60s, thanks to this particular ‘old school tie’. The Yorkshire Pullman wasn’t the only London – Yorkshire Pullman service, the Spa town of Harrogate had the Harrogate Sunday Pullman, which ran during the 1950s and 60s and included a Bradford portion.  The Queen of Scots, also a Pullman service,  which commenced in May 1928, running between Kings Cross and Glasgow Queen Street also called at Leeds and Harrogate, en route.

The photograph shows B1 class 4-6-0 No.1306, now named Mayflower, sans Pullman coaches, approaching Berwyn Station, on the Llangollen Railway, with a Llangollen – Carrog service, before the new extension to Corwen opened.

Check out Sunday’s post, for a very special anniversary.

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