Tag Archives: North Eastern Railway

Only a minor leak

Today’s photo from the NYMR’s autumn gala  shows Ex-NER 0-6-0  Class P3, LNER Class J27, No.2392 / BR No.65894 with a pretty decent freight working including a fish van, milk tank, cattle wagon, oil tank, and a narrow gauge engine on a flat wagon, in the train. No.65894  is doing her best to recreate steam’s final days  in the North-East with steam oozing everywhere from the front end.

Before you ask – I have no idea what the significance of the Blue Star is. However, there will be more from the NYMR gala later this week;  and a reminder that the first part of my memories of life on the footplate in the 1960s is now available, in print, or as an Ebook, which at £1.99 has to be a bargin.

Here’s the link to Part I : https://read.amazon.co.uk/kp/embed?linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_gOoNjfwj3yip64&asin=B07HMKTWMT&tag=kpembed-20&amazonDeviceType=A2CLFWBIMVSE9N&from=Bookcard&preview=inline

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The perfect puffer

This little railway scene, was once a part of George ‘The Railway King’ Hudson’s empire, when it was bought by his York & North Midland Railway, in 1845,  today it’s a slice of classic NER / LNER / BR (North Eastern Region). The station, built by the North Eastern Railway, to a design by their in house architect, Thomas Prosser, is little changed since 1908. Originally named Goathland Mill, it is at least as well known, to Harry potter fans, as Hogsmeade and to lovers of Heartbeat,  as Aidensfield. The effect this has had on the numbers of visitors to Goathland is staggering.

Thompson’s B1 was the archetypal secondary route passenger service locomotive on British Railways North Eastern Region’s lines in 1950s and early 1960s Britain. Designed during World War II, in LNER days, many of the B1s were built post-Nationalisation by British Railways, with a batch of ten being constructed at Gorton Works, which were opened, in 1848, by the Sheffield, Ashton – under – Lyne & Manchester Railway, later the Manchester Sheffield & Lincoln, and then the Great Central Railway. B1 No.61349 was the last locomotive constructed at Gorton, in 1951.

The MK1 coaches were introduced by BR in 1951 and the maroon livery was adopted post 1956. The original bogies  on the Mk1s gave a less than smooth ride which led to an ‘improved’ version entering production in 1958, with the modified MK1s becoming known, at  the time, as the ‘commonwealth bogie’ stock.

And finally, four little puffs of smoke as No.61264 eases out of  Hogsfieldland Station in the warm spring sunshine … aaaaaH!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Seems like only Yesterday

1054gdsblkwhtVictorian England meets modern Britain, hot oil and sulphur cheek by jowl with flash cards and memory sticks. 0-6-2T No 1054, a.k.a. ‘the coal tank’ was, when new, the property of the London & North Western Railway; and at a time when the L&NWR was practically the largest company on the planet – the Microsoft / Amazon / Google of the 1880s. When No. 1054 was new, rivalry between railway companies for trade and traffic was intense – speed was an important factor in the competition equation. Not that I’m suggesting No.1054 is a speed machine, especially as she is a tank version of Webb’s 17″ Standard Goods engine.

However, in the year No.1054 was built a race, of sorts took place, between the companies operating the rival routes from London to Scotland – the East and West coast routes with the L&NWR and Caledonian Railway on the west coast and the Great Northern Railway, the North Eastern Railway and the North British Railway on the east coast. In the summer of 1888 the east and west coast routes began a series of tit-for-tat accelerations to their principal Scottish Express service – a quite definite precursor to the famous ‘Race to the North’ conducted by the same companies in 1895.

So that’s five companies, all kind of collaborating, to ‘race’ their trains against each other – seems like technology isn’t the only thing to have changed since 1888.

For any of you wanting to know more, or enjoy reading my blogs and the photographs, in them why not buy yourselves a copy of my book. 30,000+  words and more than 100 photographs.

The following are totally unsolicited comments from people who have read  Gricing: ‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’ – ‘ I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. – and from another ‘satisfied’ reader’ – ‘ I was given what I believe to be your book called Gricing the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!’

This is the link to my book “Gricing: The Real Story of the Railway Children.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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