Tag Archives: No.48151

The ‘starred’ 8F

Tuesday’s Dalesman was again in the hands of the ‘starred’ 8F No.48151, and she is seen here northbound, at Langcliffe, just a couple of miles beyond Settle Junction.  Built at Crewe in 1942 No.48151 spent her first seven years at Grangemouth before becoming a Canklow engine in 1949, where, apart from a brief spell at Wellingborough, she remained until 1962 – I very much doubt that she saw much by way of passenger duties at either location. Somewhat more surprising is that ‘in preservation’ she has worked freight trains, a stone hopper train from  Ribblehead quarry over the S&C to Carlisle and at Tunstead quarry during a short spell on loan there.

Canklow, 19C later 41D, (Rotherham), opened in 1875 and closed to steam in 1965 and the nearest I could find to a passenger engine, on the books, was a ‘Flying Pig’ No.43037 which spent quite some time there in the 1950s and 60s. At Grangemouth No.48151 would have been rubbing shoulders with WD 2-10-0s and ancient Ex-Caledonian Railway Drummond, Pickersgill, and McIntosh 0-6-0s, like the 1899 vintage, McIntosh 3F, No.828, (BR No.57566), which is still running on the Strathspey Railway.

Grangemouth was one of the Scottish sheds I visited during a round Scotland track and shed bash in 1964, not the most accessible spot to reach using public transport, like Thornton Jct., which was another one on the list we visited. I had my one and only footplate trip on an A4 during this tour, riding on No.60026 Miles Beevor from Aberdeen up to Stonehaven – a very different experience from the Bulleid Pacifics I was working on, out of Waterloo. Quite what the Aberdeen men made of me I don’t know, the fireman was old enough to be my dad and the driver my grandad!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Down by the river

Strangely, for a mainly goods depot and with both Black 5s and Jubilees on the allocation, my first shed, Farnley Jct., didn’t have any 8Fs.   There were ‘visitors’ from places like Heaton Mersey or Newton Heath, possibly from even further afield but, none on the books. My own outings on them were during a very brief loan spell at Stourton and at Wakefield. I had two turns, as I recall, at Stourton, one was all round the houses in Leeds which included a trip over to Neville Hill; the other, a Carlisle bound mixed goods, from Stourton yard, to Skipton, where we were relieved – the back working was a diesel, a Type 2 Bo-Bo, with a parcels train – heady stuff.

David Smith must really like his 8F, No.48151, because he’s kept her in main line condition for quite some time now – give or take, she’s been out and about on the main line for 30 years, minus time out for overhauls. In the 1990s she hauled a 975 ton train of hopper wagons whilst on loan at Tunstead Quarry and in 2000 she hauled a train of loaded hoppers over the S&C to Carlisle, from Ribblehead Quarry.

In the photo above she is hauling the snappily titled ‘Scenic Carlisle Express II’ and is seen alongside the river Ribble, at Helwith Bridge, between Stainforth and Horton – in – Ribblesdale.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Wonders of techno’

Half way up a hill, in the middle of nowhere, waiting for a train which, thanks to mobile phones and Real Time Trains, we knew was 6 late away from Hellifield and 7 down at Ribblehead. There’s something more than a little anachronistic about being able to digitally photograph 19th century technology, running over a 19th century route built, in large part, with little more than picks and shovels, donkeys and dynamite, whilst tracking its progress, from block to block, ‘through the ether’, so to speak. We could hear No.48151 coming from a mile or more away and you could smell the sulphur on the breeze as  she passed.

One of the bug bears of the railway photographer’s life is like the fisherman’s ‘one that got away’, only in their case it’s the moment the train appears the sun disappears. This shot was very close to ‘one that got away’; the clouds were chasing the train and, as you can see, with the rear of the train already in shadow, they very nearly won.

No.48151 is pictured crossing Lunds viaduct with the ‘Pendle Dalesman’. Many years ago, when I was writing for Steam Railway News, I rode on No.48151, on one of the Carnforth – Sellafield Shuttles, even put a few rounds on, just for ‘old times sake’.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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