Tag Archives: No.46115 Scots Guardsman

2017 A personal review

A year of firsts and farewells, though for me 2017 was the year of the ‘End of Southern Steam’; an event celebrated, if that’s the right word, at quite a few heritage lines; and I very much enjoyed seeing Nos. 34081 92 Squadron and 34053 Sir Keith Park, at the Great Central Railway’s offering.  There was even a brief glimpse of No.73156 running as No.73084 Tintagel, like Nos. 34081 and 34053, another engine I’d worked on back in the 60s.

No.73156 / 73084 was one of the firsts too, as she was making her debut appearance after being rescued from Dai Woodhams yard in Barry and restored to operational condition at Loughborough. Sadly, teething problems with the brakes curtailed her official workings, to just one passenger turn on the first day of the gala.

Earlier, in February, there was a bold experiment on the Settle & Carlisle line with No.60163 Tornado hauling regular service trains, for a 3 day spell, between Skipton and Appleby. There were two runs each day and I managed to photograph the first return working, at Selside, on Valentine’s Day. No.60163 also set a first, being given a trial run at 100mph on the ECML, a thrill for all concerned, I’m sure. The data being gathered was intended to support the case for raising the speed limit for steam, on the main line, from 75mph to 90mph.

Sticking with the main line theme, 2017 saw the S&C officially re-opened, after major repairs, with a run behind No.60103 Flying Scotsman, to Carlisle and the S&C also saw main line stalwart, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, bow out when her boiler ticket expired in August – she is pictured at the top of the article, at Kirkby Stephen station , on her last run over the S&C.

No.60103 Flying Scotsman, crossing Lunds viaduct, on the S&C.

Being a Leeds lad I’m rather fond of the Scots which, for many years, were the principal express engines on the former LMS / MR /LNWR routes in and out of the City. In line to replace her, out on the main line, is another engine steaming for the first time since being saved from the scrap yard, No.35018 British India Line, and again one of the engines I have fired on passenger services, out of Waterloo, in the 60s.

Continuing the Southern theme, I never worked on the Schools, though there were several in store at 70A when I started there. 2017 saw Schools Class, No.926 Repton, return to traffic on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, following her ten year overhaul. She is pictured above, slogging up the last half mile of the steep climb from Grosmont to Goathland during the NYMR gala.

On a personal note, I made my first ever visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, a little gem in the midst of some wonderful scenery. The locomotive in the photograph is, Sir Tom, a Bagnall 0-4-0ST of 1926 vintage. Sir Tom was employed at BICC in Kent until 1968 and moved to Threlkeld in 2001. Sir Tom was overhauled and rebuilt at Threlkeld and re-entered traffic in 2010.

As the year drew to a close it was farewell to Black 5 No.44806 at the NYMR and No.7812 Erlestoke Manor at the Severn Valley. No.61994 The Great Marquess, and shortly No.60009 Union of South Africa, are to become museum exhibits, no longer gracing the main lines and flying a flag for the LNER, which is sad, especially as the locomotives, of constituents of the LNER, are few in number when compared with the other members of the Big Four.

Not to end on sour note No.7812 Erlestoke Manor, pictured above approaching Bewdley tunnel with a Bridgnorth – Kidderminster service, is to have a fast track overhaul and is expected back by 2020. Good progress is being made with the new build No.82045, a project of which I’m a keen supporter. The 82xxxs were great fun to work on and the ideal engine for a heritage railway operation. I’m very much looking forward to seeing and photographing the finished item.

All of you, I’m sure, have your own highlights from 2017 and I could have added a few more of my own, seeing the Steam Elephant in operation at Beamish was a treat, as was having the Tanfield Railway just 15 minutes drive away, and I leave you with one of my favourite shots from Tanfield in 2017.

Keighley Gasworks No.2, with Bobgins cabin in the background, is heading for Andrews House with a train from East Tanfield.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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A brief review of my 2017 in words and pictures.

A year of firsts and farewells, though for me 2017 was the year of the ‘End of Southern Steam’; an event celebrated, if that’s the right word, at quite a few heritage lines; and I very much enjoyed seeing Nos. 34081 92 Squadron and 34053 Sir Keith Park, at the Great Central Railway’s offering.  There was even a brief glimpse of No.73156 running as No.73084 Tintagel, like Nos. 34081 and 34053, another engine I’d worked on back in the 60s.

No.73156 / 73084 was one of the firsts too, as she was making her debut appearance after being rescued from Dai Woodhams yard in Barry and restored to operational condition at Loughborough. Sadly, teething problems with the brakes curtailed her official workings, to just one passenger turn on the first day of the gala.

Earlier, in February, there was a bold experiment on the Settle & Carlisle line with No.60163 Tornado hauling regular service trains, for a 3 day spell, between Skipton and Appleby. There were two runs each day and I managed to photograph the first return working, at Selside, on Valentine’s Day. No.60163 also set a first, being given a trial run at 100mph on the ECML, a thrill for all concerned, I’m sure. The data being gathered was intended to support the case for raising the speed limit for steam, on the main line, from 75mph to 90mph.

Sticking with the main line theme, 2017 saw the S&C officially re-opened, after major repairs, with a run behind No.60103 Flying Scotsman, to Carlisle and the S&C also saw main line stalwart, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, bow out when her boiler ticket expired in August – she is pictured at the top of the article, at Kirkby Stephen station , on her last run over the S&C.

No.60103 Flying Scotsman, crossing Lunds viaduct, on the S&C.

Being a Leeds lad I’m rather fond of the Scots which, for many years, were the principal express engines on the former LMS / MR /LNWR routes in and out of the City. In line to replace her, out on the main line, is another engine steaming for the first time since being saved from the scrap yard, No.35018 British India Line, and again one of the engines I have fired on passenger services, out of Waterloo, in the 60s.

Continuing the Southern theme, I never worked on the Schools, though there were several in store at 70A when I started there. 2017 saw Schools Class, No.926 Repton, return to traffic on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, following her ten year overhaul. She is pictured above, slogging up the last half mile of the steep climb from Grosmont to Goathland during the NYMR gala.

On a personal note, I made my first ever visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, a little gem in the midst of some wonderful scenery. The locomotive in the photograph is, Sir Tom, a Bagnall 0-4-0ST of 1926 vintage. Sir Tom was employed at BICC in Kent until 1968 and moved to Threlkeld in 2001. Sir Tom was overhauled and rebuilt at Threlkeld and re-entered traffic in 2010.

As the year drew to a close it was farewell to Black 5 No.44806 at the NYMR and No.7812 Erlestoke Manor at the Severn Valley. No.61994 The Great Marquess, and shortly No.60009 Union of South Africa, are to become museum exhibits, no longer gracing the main lines and flying a flag for the LNER, which is sad, especially as the locomotives, of constituents of the LNER, are few in number when compared with the other members of the Big Four.

Not to end on sour note No.7812 Erlestoke Manor, pictured above approaching Bewdley tunnel with a Bridgnorth – Kidderminster service, is to have a fast track overhaul and is expected back by 2020. Good progress is being made with the new build No.82045, a project of which I’m a keen supporter. The 82xxxs were great fun to work on and the ideal engine for a heritage railway operation. I’m very much looking forward to seeing and photographing the finished item.

All of you, I’m sure, have your own highlights from 2017 and I could have added a few more of my own, seeing the Steam Elephant in operation at Beamish was a treat, as was having the Tanfield Railway just 15 minutes drive away, and I leave you with one of my favourite shots from Tanfield in 2017.

Keighley Gasworks No.2, with Bobgins cabin in the background, is heading for Andrews House with a train from East Tanfield.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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All the best for 2018

70 years ago British Railways came into being and 50 years ago they called a halt to regular steam hauled services. On the 8th & 9th of June 1948, Bulleid Light Pacific No.34006 Bude, as part of the hastily arranged ‘Locomtive Exchange Trails’  worked over the Great Central Railway route between Marylebone and Manchester London Road, working north on the 8th and returning south on the 9th. Cecil J. Allen decribed her perfomance as, ‘amazing’.

2017 saw the usual crop of farewells and returns to steam, and I’m sure we all have our favourites in both categories. I enjoyed seeing, and hearing, the last few runs of No.46115 Scots Guardsman over the S&C route, she certainly bowed out in style. In the fresh from scrapyard condition, I was very much looking forward to the return of No.35018 British India Line, an engine I worked on in the 1960s – I’ve seen the videos but, yet to see her, in the flesh. A treat for 2018 I hope.  Winner of the fresh from overhaul prize is the engine in the photograph above, B-o-B Class 4-6-2 No.34081 92 Squadron, pictured shortly after departing from Loughborough.

One of No.46115 Scots Guardsman’s last runs, at Aisgill, earlier in 2017.

Over the last 50 years I have visited lines all over Britain and in Europe but, a first for me in 2017 was a visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, and what a charming place it is, like Arnie ‘I’ll be back’.

All that remains now is to wish everyone a very happy and prosperous New Year and leave you with the knowledge that our hobby, it would seem, is in good hands.If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

 

 

 

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Farewell Postman Pat

The shadows are lengthening as, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, sails through Kirkby Stephen with the ‘up’ Thames Clyde Express. (actually the return leg of the Fellsman.) This is the final working before she has her a ten year overhaul, let’s hope she gets a fast track. I had hoped she’d be ‘shoveling white steam over her shoulder’ – just a bit too warm for that, sadly.

Affectionately known as ‘Postman Pat’, because, in her original form she hauled ‘The Night Mail’,  a classic  of British documentary film making, accompanyed by Auden’s wonderful poem, about the operation of the Travelling Post Office and the journey of the ‘Night Mail’ from Euston to Glasgow.

I’ve worked a few mail trains, one of them was the 22:35 Ex-Waterloo, a turned I enjoyed quite a few times whilst a fireman at Nine Elms. One of the more memorable journeys on this turn was a run with No.34006 Bude and driver Gordon Porter. Driver Porter was a lovely bloke to work with and he enjoyed a fast run. We left Basingstoke with the rockets flying and reached 95mph as we headed down the bank to Winchester.  Only the need to stop prevented us hitting the ton.

No.34006 Bude was in still in her original ‘air smoothed’ form and was a bit of a pet – having been one of the participants in the ‘mixed traffic’ class, during the 1948 Locomotive Exchange Trails. No 34006 Bude worked over the GWR main line between Plymouth and Brristol and the Great Central Railway route between London (Marylebone) and Manchester.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Scot free

This is, I’m sure, the way most of us remember the Scots, in their Stanier rebuilt form, and in BR Green livery, almost unrecognisable from the engines designed by Fowler, for the LMS, in 1927. When I was growing up these engines hauled the principal express services, south to London and north to Glasgow, from my home in Leeds.  I had aunts and uncles living in Sheffield and, on visits to them, I  travelled behind quite a few of the Scots which were allocated to Holbeck during the 1950s and 60s.

No.46100 Royal Scot, the engine pictured, was allocated to 8A Edge Hill in 1946 and from 1948 until 1959 she was a Camden engine; in  in 1959 she was transferred to 16A Nottingham.  However, some of the Scots remained at the same shed from 01/01/1948 until withdrawn. Nos. 46102/04/05/07/21 were all at Polmadie and No. 46124 London Scottish was an Edge Hill engine for the same period. Some of the rarer allocations include, in September 1959, Nos. 46163 Civil Service Rifleman and 46165 The Ranger (12th London Regt.) which were allocated to Preston, they left 6 months later, in April 1960. A handfull were allocated to Canklow and some to Bushbury; Holyhead seemed to have allocations which lasted only a matter of weeks. Low Moor, (Bradford) and Mirfield were also unlikely allocations for a Royal Scot but several engines did spend short periods there in the early 1960s.

The Scot were are about to lose, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, spent time at Crewe, Carlisle, Upperby and Kingmoor, Longsight, and, for reasons unknown, 6 weeks at Springs Branch (Wigan), in June / July 1964.  I did hear, on the rumour mill, that No.46115 Scots Guardsman is to be ‘fast tracked through her overhaul’ – let’s hope so. Seeing and hearing the Scots, as they battle the northern hills and fells, is one of the sights and sounds guarenteed to bring back those care-free days of 1950s train spotting.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

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Yesterday’s Scot

Having looked at the weather forecast, 16C and sunny, I set off for the trip to Aisgill. However, as you can see from the photo, it certainly wasn’t sunny and it was pretty windy too. One day I’ll get lucky and there’ll be sun and exhaust! Until that great day I’ll have to settle for the wonderful sounds we enjoyed as she roared her way to Aisgill summit, not much beyond where I’m standing.

Going to ‘classic’ locations is a bit like going trainspotting as a kid, there’s almost always a small band of mostly middle aged, and older, men, standing around chattering about matters railway or photographic often both. A frequent talking point, and sore topic, is sending photos to the railway magazines, and them not publishing them. Naturally your photo was better than the one they did print, and ‘it’s always the same names’ that get their photos in the magazine. And there’s more than a grain of truth in that.

In the early 1990s I was involved with the now defuct Steam Railway News, and even a little newspaper like SRN  received more photos than they could use – and that was in the pre-digital age. Everything was ‘a print’.  It also has to be said that whilst the sender may have been thrilled with his/her effort, some did leave a lot to be desired. Working to a dead line, dealing with 100s, if not thousands, of images, it is little wonder that Editors stick with who they know and trust. If the photo is professionally presented, captioned, and submitted in accordance with the ‘house’ requirements, it makes the editor’s job so much easier, and, like any of us, they take the easy route

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Aisgill – the long view

Not the usual view from Aisgill – No.46115 Scots Guardsman with Saturday’s Cumbrian Mountain Express is pictured here just above Angrholme farm on the long sweeping curve that will bring her across in front of us for the classic Aisgill shot with Wild Boar Fell for the backdrop.

In the 1950s, when the Scots were in their heyday on the Settle & Carlisle, British Railways used this route, between Lazonby and Crosby Garrett, to test the steaming rate of the new Britannia class Pacifics. using No. 70005 John Milton shortly after the engine was constructed.

The run was made to assess the maximum steaming capability rather than speed but the results were, nonetheless, astonishing. The load behind the tender was gargantuan  850 tons, way beyond anything which would be seen in normal traffic conditions.

The  details I have come from O.S. Nock’s famous Railway Magazine articles Locomotive Practice and Performance and they cover the run, over the Settle – Carlisle route, from Lazonby to Crosby Garrett, a distance of 23.1 miles which was covered in 29.15 minutes – this includes a p-way slack to just 15mph between New Biggin and Long Marton a stretch of line on which the gradient is between 1 in 440 and 1 in 660.

However, apart from a short dip after Appleby, on the approach to Ormside viaduct, the line is on a steady upward trend for the entire 23.1 miles with several miles at gradients varying between 1 in 100, 1 in 120, 1 in 132 and 1 in 166. The steaming rate over this section is calculated at the very high figure of 36,000lbs per hour. To maintain this rate for almost 30 minutes took the combined efforts of two firemen, and as Nock himself says, ‘It should be emphasized, however, that this was the performance of a lifetime, and one that it would be difficult to equal once in a hundred runs.’ (Nock, Locomotive Practice and Performance p193)

The Scot, on Saturday wasn’t on test but, she was going very well and flying a feather!!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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