Tag Archives: Leeds

The tiny tank engine

This tiny little Ex-NER  H Class 0-4-0, No.1310, is photographed at Moor Road, at the end of the Balm Road branch, on the Middleton Railway. Designed by T W Wordsell in 1888 twenty-four were built, nineteen at Gateshead and the rest at Darlington with the last one being built in 1923 by the LNER. No 1310 was constructed in 1891 withdrawn in 1931 and sold to Robert Frazer & Sons. No.1310 was then sold to Pelaw Main Collieries and became part of the NCB in 1949, who renumbered her 63. In 1965, No.1310 was bought by the Steam Power Trust, and has been at the Middleton Railway pretty much ever since.

I know from my stats that these blogs have been viewed in over 130 countries and that over a ten day period, last month, every single one of them was seen by someone, or some group, in South Korea, which was odd. I will still be taking photographs and my portfolio can be seen here:  https://www.picfair.com/users/dropgrate

I will still be continuing to write; the last three parts of “In Memory”, my footplate memoire, will be appearing in 2019, with Part III planned for February and Parts IV and V at roughly 2 or 3 month intervals. Part II is available now, in print or as an ebook, at:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Memory-Part-II-David-Wilson/dp/1731324022/

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Time running and time passing

In less than two weeks Steam Age Daydreams will close – there are over 600 blogs and even more photographs on the web site – check them out before they all disappear into the ether. However, before they do I’m hoping to get to the GCR’s Last Hurrah event this weekend, so there may be a few fresh posts next week.

Part II of “In Memory”, the memoire of my  footplate days, is now available to download as an ebook – the paper back version will be available very shortly. The link to Part II is below. And below that is a link to Part I in case you haven’t read it yet.

I will still be passing my time photographing steam locomotives and for those of you who have enjoyed reading the Blog – I will be continuing to write, Part II of ‘In Memory’ is available now and parts III, IV and V will follow at intervals in the New Year.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Up ‘ill ‘n’ darn dale

In the 1960s, as a 15 year old, I learned how to fire steam locomotives working on Black 5s going from Leeds to Manchester and back.  This was very much an uphill and down dale route – which ever way you went you climbed the Pennines and then ran down the other side. A favourite turn, to take a ride out on, was the Red Bank vans, always double-headed, and often two of Farnley’s Black 5s.

There are two main line runs coming up which both remind me of my time on the footplate. The first, this Saturday, is the ‘Citadel’ booked for double-headed Black 5s and working from Manchester to Carlisle via the S&C, crossing and recrossing the Pennines. The second run is next month’s ‘Pennine Moors Explorer’ which reminds me of my time at Wakefield in the final days of steam and working over Copy Pit with wheezing clanking Dubdees and train loads of coal, returning whence we came with the empties.

The Pennine Moors Explorer might even be hauled by an engine I actually worked on whilst I was a fireman at Nine Elms – No.34046 Braunton, which would be wonderful to see, and hear, it’s quite a pull from Todmorden through Cornholme and Portsmouth and on up to Copy Pit summit where, with the coal trains, we would have to stop and pin down wagon brakes for the long roll down to Gannow Junction.

Just as the lights went out on my railway career they will very soon be going out on Steam Age Daydreams too.

I will still be passing my time photographing steam locomotives and for those of you who have enjoyed reading the Blog – I will be continuing to write, Part II of ‘In Memory’ will be available before the end of the month with parts III, IV and V to follow at intervals in the New Year. If you’ve enjoyed my photographs the Steam Age Daydreams 2019 Calendar is now on sale on eBay – here’s the link: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302936132284

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Steam Age Daydreams 2019 Calendar is now on sale here’s the link:  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302936132284

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

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Moorland Landscape

I’ve been coming here, to the North Yorkshire Moors, for over 35 years now. I’ve seen an awful lot of engines come and go, some I even worked on when they were still in BR stock; engines like the soon to return 34101 Hartland and the S15 No. (30)825 and the not so lucky 30841, which is gone but not forgotten.

There’s also the possibilty I worked on the engine in the picture too, No.(4)5428 was a Holbeck engine at one time and I had a couple of months at the depot after moving back North from Nine Elms.  I did a variety of turns during those few weeks including some passenger work and my first,  last, and only turn  on a B1. My first shed, Farnley Jct., had already closed and so had Copley Hill with work from both depots now being done from Holbeck. My trip with the B1 was a former Copley Hill turn – Cleethorpes and back with a stopper.

The turn I might well have worked with No.(4)5428 was a teatime departure from Leeds City to Morecambe calling at, if memory serves, Keighley, Skipton, and then all stations on the little North Western. We travelled home passenger after beign relieved at, as I recall, Bare Lane, so we could make the last DMU back to Leeds.

No.(4)5428 is pictured at Moorgates during the recent NYMR autumn gala event.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that  work.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Part II of In Memory is now available and here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Memory-Part-II-C-Wilson-ebook/dp/B07KJQ94BD/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1542361240&sr=8-1&keywords=in+memory+part+II

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires at the beginning of December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

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The Three Gricers

Bursting into the light at Beckhole, Schools Class 4-4-0 No.926 Repton is at the head of the 13:37 Grosmont – Goathland freight. Strangely, because of the pattern of No.926’s exhaust it almost looks as though the little narrow gauge engine, visiting from the Talyllyn Railway, No.6 Douglas, is acting as a banker: she’s actually on a flat wagon as part of the goods set. Sticking with strange and visiting engines; Ex-GWR 2-8-0 ‘heavy freight’ No.2857, visiting from the Severn Valley Railway, didn’t do one turn on the goods during the public timetable of the gala. In fact the bulk of the goods turns were completed by No.926 Repton.

I wonder what the ‘Public’ schools would have thought about an engine with their name on it being used to haul goods trucks, and one a cattle truck at that. I say this because when the engines were being built and named, during the early 1930s, at least one Public school objected to having their named attached to an engine;  No. 923 Uppingham  was renamed Bradfield after the school complained.

 

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Stanier’s 5

Now in LMS livery and looking very smart, Class 5 4-6-0 No.5428 is about to cross over the Goathland – Pickering road at Moorgates, close to the summit of the climb from Grosmont. With any locomotive engineer there is, understandably, a tendency to concentrate attention on their express engine designs. In Stanier’s case this is his Cornonation Class Pacifics and to a lesser extent his Princess Class. However, for my money his most succesfull locomotive was the one pictured here.

The Black 5 proved to be robust, reliable, a good steamer and loved by the crews who worked on them, myself included. They are well proportioned and uncluttered in their outline and, when called upon, had a fair turn of speed too.  I have seen timing logs of them deputising for A4s on the ‘Saint Mungo’ from Glasgow to Aberdeen and, to within seconds, keeping time. Their performances on some of the last steam services in the North West were the stuff of legend – the Belfast Boat Express became their star turn, in its latter days.

I can’t speak for others but, I’m looking forward to seeing a pair of them double-heading the ‘Citadel’ from Manchester to Carlisle and back on the 8th & 10th of next month.  I did work on the 5s between Leeds and Manchester and Leeds to Morecambe and you can read about my time on them in part 1 of my memories of  being a fireman in the last years of steam – here’s the link.

One happy customer commented – ‘Just read part 1 Enjoyed it – a lot.’

Here’s the link to Part I : https://read.amazon.co.uk/kp/embed?linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_gOoNjfwj3yip64&asin=B07HMKTWMT&tag=kpembed-20&amazonDeviceType=A2CLFWBIMVSE9N&from=Bookcard&preview=inline

 

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Coal and water

Looking very smart in her LMS livery No.5428 sits under the coal hopper at Grosmont; the fireman is just making his way up to the hopper controls. The blower is on and the lamp is already on the top bracket; after coaling up No.5428 will back down to the water column and take water before going off-shed for her turn of duty – the 12:30 service from Grosmont to Pickering. Just another day at the office, you might say.

I did all this countless time during my own footplate career, and, quite possibly on No.5428, or 45428  as she was then. No.45428 had spells at Holbeck & Farnley Jct. but, if I did do a turn on her footplate it was most likely at Holbeck in early 1966, after Farnley had already closed. I’m not 100% certain but, I believe it was on No.45428 that I worked a tea-time departure from Leeds to Morecambe, which if memory serves stopped at Keighley, Skipton, and then most of the stations on the ‘Little North Western’. I have a vague memory of being relived at Green Ayre and  travelling home on the cushions. It is a long time ago so don’t quote me on that.

Whilst I was at Grosmont, I saw the Q6 moving under her own steam and being readied for her trip to the Severn Valley Gala. Also there was B-o-B No.34081 92 Squadron, not in steam and engine facing Whitby – you can see her tender to the left of No.5428. I do hope they turn her before the gala at the end of the month.

Some of you might be interested to know that my book, Railway Tales, about my own footplate work during the last years of BR steam, is now available as an ebook here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Railway-Tales-C-D-Wilson-ebook/dp/B07H38XV1V/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536155603&sr=1-2&keywords=railway+tales+ebook

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Coach window

The East Coast Main Line, well sort of. All the ingredients are there Ex-NER fixtures and fittings, an Ex-LNER A4, 1950s rolling stock and it does go to the coast. It could almost be the Elizabethan streaking south through Northumberland. This isn’t the only fantasy though, as this particular location is to be found in Harry Potter movies and TV series, Heartbeat. It is the view from the window of a poll winning bus service too; The four times daily, route 840 from Leeds to Whitby, which won the title of Britain’s most scenic route earlier this year.

The idea that a line from Leeds to Whitby via York and Malton might provide a scenic attraction for visitors from around the world seemed strangely absent when the section of line from Rillington Jct to Whitby was closed.  Like the other East Coast line; the one that ran through Staithes, Sandsend, Whitby, Robin Hoods Bay and on to Scarborough which closed in 1965. This route was unquestionably a tricky one in winter when sea mist made visibility poor and the rails wet – but from Easter to October – well that’s a different kettle of fish.

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Bringing the cheque ……..

“The cheque’s in the post” – but hopefully not in this demonstation of the TPO on the Great Central Railway, it really would never get there. My first ever shed bash to London, from my home in Leeds, was on what would be described as the ‘mail train’. We left Leeds at around 10:15 and arrived in St. Pancras at about 06:00. The trip was  an advertised excursion; and the cost of the ticket must have been very small, we were all still schoolboys. Like the journey south we had to return on a designated service at around 18:00, as I recall; more than enough time for a trip round the London Termini and trips to Stratford, Old Oak Common, and Willesden sheds.

I say we because I did the trip on several occasions and with different travelling companions. The trips, made during 1960 and 61, also included visits to Kentish Town and a futile attempt to bunk Camden. Surprisingly, in view of my later time on the footplate, we didn’t go ‘south of the river’ during these excursions.  In today’s social climate the very idea of 3 or 4 teenage lads, from a city in northern England would travel to London and spend several hours tresspassing on railway property, would have folk going mental – the tabloid press would have a field day and the PC brigade would have had our parents locked up. My how times change.

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Gricing – The Real Story of the Railway Children

For any of you wanting to know more, or enjoy reading my blogs and the photographs, in them why not buy yourselves a copy of my book. “Gricing” 30,000+  words and more than 100 photographs.

The following are totally unsolicited comments from people who have read  Gricing: ‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’ – ‘ I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. – and from another ‘satisfied’ reader’ – ‘ I was given what I believe to be your book called Gricing the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!’

This is the link to “Gricing: The Real Story of the Railway Children.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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