Tag Archives: K&WVR

Standard Stopper

At the beginning of 1963, when I first arrived at Nine Elms, I spent a short time in Link 4 with driver Fred Walker and these BR class 4s were amongst the first engines I worked on, No.75078 was one of them. A regular duty for the 75xxxs was the Waterloo – Basingstoke stoppers, calling Woking then all stations to Basingstoke. The key to keeping time on these services was starting quickly and braking late – and the 75xxxs were very nippy, ideally suited to this task.

When stopping at the intermediate stations, once the train had been brought to a stand, Fred would blow the brakes off and hold the train on the engine’s steam brake while waiting for the tip. Starting in full forward gear he would ease away from the platform steadily opening the regulator before reeling in the cut-off, first to around 50% before giving her  full regulator and then notching up to around 25 – 30%, by which time speed would be nudging 50. A mile or two at 60 ish and then time to shut-off for the next stop and a repeat of the process.

On my side of the footplate it was keep a good fire under the door, thinning to the front and top it up each time we stopped. Between Woking and Farnborough there was a bit more to do because of the climb up to MP31 but, once over the hump that was it; apart, that is, from the top ups at the stops.

The train engine No.34092 City of Wells was one of the dozen or so Bulleid ‘light’ Pacifics I never worked on during my days at Nine Elms but, on the plus side, the preserved 34007 Wadebridge was the very first of the original Bulleids I fired. The photograph shows the pair departing Keighley with the 11:55 for Oxenhope on 26 June, during the 50th anniversary celebrations.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Party poopers

I remember visting Keighley in 1965, whilst I was still a BR fireman at Nine Elms, and seeing No.69523, a little later she became No.4744, later still No.1744, as she is now, sat in the yard at Haworth along with No.51218. One of my chums lived in Ingrow, so I got all the local gossip too. I don’t think any of us, at the time, ever imagined the line would become the attraction it has – I doubt any of us imagined being fifty, let alone seeing the railway it all became – 50 years on.

Not a picture from 50 years ago but, another of the very earliest arrivals and a personal favourite, sadly not in action at the party.

No.78022 when she was fitted wih the Giesl ejector, a short lived experiment. No.78022 is soon to be returned to traffic, minus the Giesl.

No. 957 aka No.52044 and ‘The Green Dragon’ of Railway Children fame, another very early arrival – 1965.

Scanned from a slide, the train engine is old stalwart, the 8F No.48431, which arrived in 1972 and first ran in 1975.

And here’s the real 5775 piloting No.48431, a scan from an old black and white print.

Sir Berkeley was another of the 1965 arrivals – I do have pics of her at Haworth but not scanned. This shot shows her at East Tanfield some years ago.

The Ex-Haydock Foundry loco – ‘Bellerophon’ was an early arrival, in 1966, though she didn’t return to steam until late in 1985.

Last, but by no means least is another old favourite which didn’t make it to the party, Jinty No.47279 – a class of engine I made my first ever footplate ride on; age 14, and a trip along the leeds Fireclay branch from Farnley Junction.

This is not an exhaustive list of the engines which have over the years been a part of the K&WVR line, rather a little snapshot of some of the old favourites which didn’t make the 50th Birthday Bash.

All that remains is to say top marks to all the volunteeers and everyone else who, over the last 50 years have, through thick and thin, made the K&WVR what it is today. And, for the splendid 50th Birthday Celebrations of the last 8 days.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Summer Special

July only – enjoy Gricing for less. From July 1st to 31st the Ebook version of Gricing is on special offer at just £3.99

Here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children-ebook/dp/B011D1WBWY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

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Hot Scot

Today’s visit to the K&WVR 50th Celebrations, provided a little addition to the usual drama of steam locomotives hard at work, there was a trackside fire at Oxenhope. Not a huge affair but, large enough to warrant the attention of the local fire brigade – with a substantial delay to services until it was all dampend down. Not quite what you want with crowds of people, in gala mood, in baking hot conditions stuck, on the train.

With nothing happening at Oxenhope we took the opportunity to move down to Ingrow, which is where we see No.46100 Royal Scot.  Now, you could be forgiven for thinking that she is hurtling through the station on her non-stop run to Oxenhope but, you’d be wrong. No.46100 Royal Scot is moving, and the lamps would indicate an express, however, in this photo she’s the tail of the top and tail working and, so far as I recall, the lamp(s) should be a single one, bottom middle, and red during the hours of darkness, in fog, or falling snow.

Moving on – the Thames Clyde Express was a regular duty, for many years, for the Royal Scots and would have been a regular sight for railway enthusiasts in and around Keighley during the 50s and early 60s, before the A3s stole some of their thunder. However, for 3 days No.46100 Royal Scot is the star attraction – and no more line side fires – please.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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The last batch

On the Western Section of British Railways Southern Region the discs, being carried by 75078, indicated a West of England service to Salisbury and Exeter. And these engines were a common sight on stopping trains out of Waterloo over this route, during my own time working on this line, in the mid-1960s. In fact, No.75078, was an engine I worked on quite a number of times on stopping passenger duties and on freight jobs, like the ‘banana trains’ from Southampton to Nine Elms Goods.

The last batch to be built, No.75065 – 75079 were allocated to the Southern, from new. They were  all eventually fitted with a double-chimney and all of them were coupled to the large BRIB tenders with a 4,725 gallon water capacity, because of the Southern’s lack  of troughs. Initially shared between Dover on the Eastern section and Exmouth Junction on the Western, many of them ended their days at Eastleigh. My 1961 Shed Book shows 2 on the books at Stewarts Lane, and 3 at Bath Green Park, which was, by then, under the Western Region of BR. On the right of the picture is Ex-S&DJR 2-8-0 7F No.53808, also of Bath Green Park, unfortunately the 75xxxs allocated to Bath, in 1961, were Nos. 75071 /2 /3, not No.75078 which was a Guildford engine and she is still carrying the 70D Guildford shed plate.

And you know that old chestnut – ‘there’s always one’ well No.75071 was withdrawn, in 1967, from Stoke. Nos.75072 & 3 were the only others from this batch not to end their days at Eastleigh; probably as a result of their posting, earlier, at Bath Green Park, both being withdrawn from Yeovil in December 1965. Amazingly 3 of this final batch survived into preservation, No.75069 is nearing the end of a major overhaul at the Severn Valley Railway, No.75079 is also under overhaul at the Mid-Hants Railway and as can be seen No.75078 is working well on the K&WVR.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Express Freight

At the beginning of the 19thCentury the turnpikes were a mess, the canals were slow, and moving large consignments of goods was fraught, time consuming, and possibly ruinous. The movement of large quantities of coal and other minerals was similarly problematic – the solution, as we all know, was the railway. Was it inevitable, that like the turnpike and the canal, the railway would have its day? Would some newer and more radical solution, to the mass movement of goods and people, be forthcoming. Thus far the answer would seem to be a resounding no.

Railway networks are still expanding, closed routes are being re-opened and newer and faster forms of propulsion are being used on them. In the case of the Maglev they no longer run on wheels but levitate above the track on a powerful magnetic field, which is also part of the means of propulsion. If this seems an awful long way from Stephenson’s Rocket, you’re right it is.  When Stephenson was building engines the properties of electromagnetism were still waiting for Michael Faraday to uncover them.  And it wasn’t until 1838, 180 years ago, this year, that Messers. Cooke and Wheatstone put these newfangled forces to work in their telegraph system, first installed on the GWR, in 1838, between Paddington and West Drayton.

The electric telegraph and the block system became the backbone of the safe movement of trains on the railway, and in one guise or another it still is. If you thought it was a long way from ‘Rocket’ to Maglev it’s an even longer one from the Bobby controlling the movement of trains, with his watch and his flag, standing by the tracks, to today’s Train Protection Warning System and computer controlled signals operated from Regional Operating Centres – not lineside signal boxes.

The photo shows Ex-LMS 4-6-0 Class 5MT No.44871, approaching Ingrow, with a recreation freight working during the K&WVR’s Spring Gala.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

 

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Bits of the old L&Y

Incorporated in 1847, one hundred years before I was born, the L&YR was, for many years,  being persued, in predatory fashion, by the much larger London North Western Railway, ‘the Euston Confederacy’ as it was sometimes referred to. The L&Y’s resistance only ended on 01/01/1922 and a year later the LNWR too became part of a bigger whole, the London Midland & Scottish Railway.

The L&Y itself, grew by acquisiton and grew out of amalgamation and absorbtion – some of its constituents were, oddly, owned jointly with the rival LNWR. Not content with running railways they also had their own fleet of ships and sailed to Europe and Ireland, from Goole, Hull, Fleetwood and Liverpool. They were also the first British railway company to introduce electric trains; with a service from Liverpool to Southport in 1904.

Before the opening of Horwich Works, the L&Y’s principal workshops were at Miles Platting, just up the bank from Manchester Exchange/Victoria. Railway workshops are never going to be situated in the ‘nice’ parts of town but, they must have been a dodgy lot around Miles Platting in the 1850s as an entire locomotive boiler was stolen, ‘spirited away in the middle of the night’, from the Works. Quite how this was achieved is a bit of a mystery, especially as  road transport was still at the horse and cart stage.

The coach behind the engine is Club car 47, a classic example of British snobbery in action. A bunch of Fylde coast ‘business men’ persuaded the L&Y, for a fee, naturally, to provide them with what was essentially a ‘private coach’ between Blackpool and Manchester, just so they didn’t have to travel alongside the ‘great unwashed’.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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War Effort

One of a batch 90 engines, built by LIMA in 1945, USATC No.5820 was shipped directly to liberated France and eventually became Polish Railways Tr. 203.474. It was said at the time, 1942 – 45, that the American GIs were ‘over sexed, over paid, and over here’. I don’t know about that but, what I do know is that 398 of these American engines were allocated to the ‘Big Four’ with 50 of them going  to the LMS.

Whether the S160s ever worked through Keighley or up the Worth valley I cannot say. The engines which were sent to Britain were shipped to South Wales and taken, intially, to Ebbw Jct. for dispersal to the other members of the Big Four, and some to storage in preparation for the D-day landings. Some of the early arrivals went to Doncaster for completion and running in on the ECML. The LNER eventually had 168 on the books, the GWR 178, and the Southern just 6.

Built to be ‘expendable’ the S160s did have their problems. From a footplateman’s perspective having only one gauge glass, and that of a an unfamiliar type, which was less than 100% reliable, wasn’t a good thing. During the first year of their deployment there were 3 boiler explosions due to low levels of water in the boiler creating a sudden crown sheet collapse; and a GWR fireman was killed in one of them.

To the right of ‘Big Jim’ is Ex-S&DJR  Class 7F 2-8-0 No.53808 an engine which would, almost certainly, have played a role in WWII, on the S&D. During the war a hospital train was stationed at Templecombe, it was kept in a state of readiness to evacuate injured and wounded from the South coast ports to military hospitals. And, when Templecombe itself was bombed, it was used to treat the casualties; five railwaymen and eight passengers died in the attack.

The photo, taken at this year’s K&WVR Winter Gala, shows ‘Big Jim’, banked by Ex-Taff Vale Railway 0-6-2T No.85, pulling away from Keighley with the ‘demo’ goods train.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

 

 

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Ancient and Modern

On the right is 1888 vintage Webb ‘Coal Tank’ No.1054 and on the left, 1951 vintage Riddles Britannia Class Pacific No.70013 Oliver Cromwell. Several years ago now, I wrote an article, for Heritage Railway magazine, about the Britannias, ‘The Last Pacifics’. On test, on the S&C, they proved capable of hauling prodigious loads and producing steam at phenomenal rates, using two firemen and top grade hard coal. I remember a quote from some footplate wag, when talking about building bigger engines, along the lines of, ‘they don’t build bigger men to fire them though.’

Unfortunately I never had the opportunity to fire a ‘Brit’ but, I did fire on all the Merchant Navies, a very high percentage of the WC / B-o-Bs, and even did a round trip Waterloo – Exeter, with an enthusiast special, so I know what it takes to keep a beast like this steaming, over long periods of time. However, we all started like the young lad leaning from the cab of No.1054, firing on a little tank engine; and at some rural depots or sub-sheds you might never work on anything bigger. The trade off was that these guys went home to their own beds, whilst the crews on the big Pacifics would be spending half a week sleeping in the railway lodging houses, and not just the crews on the Pacifics, long distance freight workings could also be lodging turns.

The lodging houses themselves varied enormously, for best part of a year I lived in the one at Old Oak Common, 24 hour canteen, snooker tables, nice little rooms, room cleaning service, all mod cons. Others were little better than a camp bed in a cubicle, and living in them would have been a prison sentence. When lodging turns were re-introduced in the 1990s, the crew were booked into hotel accomodation. A slightly more modern approach than a wooden cubicle with a curtain across the entrance and a camp type bed to sleep on.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Modern Britain

When the class, of which No.75078 is a member, was introduced in 1951 they were designated  as  British Railways ‘standard class’ 4. The ‘standard classes’ were to be the face of ‘Modern British Railways’, and 75078’s big sister, No.70004 William Shakespeare was exhibited at the Festival of Britain, held in the same year. In 1963 I began working on them, out of Waterloo, on trains carrying the very same headcode – Waterloo – West of England, and No.75078 was one of the ones I worked on.

One of the services we used them on were the ‘stoppers’ to Basingstoke, Woking and then ‘all stations’. They were nippy little engines and would gallop away from the stops and flew along quite happily with full regulator and 25% cut-off. I don’t know if anyone ever bothered to time these stoppers but we had a lot of fun seeing just how quickly the intermediate sprints could be done.  The first one was Woking to Farnborough which included the pull up to MP 31 but, a bit of a dip down into Farnborough as compensation.

The distance from Woking to Farnborough is almost 9 miles and passing times of 11 minutes, give or take,  for WC/B-o-B were regularly achieved with around 350 – 375 ton trains. A stopping time would, of course, be slower, and a smaller engine would, likewise, be a tad off the pace.  Quite by chance one of my runs with the 02.45 papers was recorded on 22/05/65, the locomotive was B-o-B No. 34086 219 Squadron, our start to pass time was 11mins.20secs and we went through Farnborough at 70mph, the load was 350 tons. We completed the start to stop Woking – Basingstoke journey in even time 23.5 miles in 23.45

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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