Tag Archives: Great Central Railway

Down stopper – back fast

One Saturday, early in January 1965, I was booked on a regular three link duty, the 08.35 Waterloo – Weymouth stopper. It was a turn where you might get a Merchant Navy, West Country, or even a BR class 5 Standard. On the day our engine was No.34022 Exmoor and we left Waterloo with 11 on for 395 tons gross. Our first stop was Surbiton and we arrived 50 seconds late, we pulled into Woking, our next stop, 25 seconds to the good.

The 08.35 down wasn’t a flyer but, we did have a bit of fun accelerating all the way, from our start out of Working, to the summit at MP31 which we passed at 54mph – we kept up a pretty even mid seventies all the way from Farnborough to Hook where we were stopped by signals.  However, despite being brought to a dead stand we still rolled into Basingstoke only 38 seconds adrift.

Twenty four minutes was the time allowed from Basingstoke to Winchester – we passed Wallers Ash box at over 80mph arriving in   Winchester a shade over two minutes early. After leaving Winchester things carried on in much the same style and we went through Eastleigh nudging 70 and nearly a minute up. It wasn’t to last, signal checks between St Denys and Northam Jct. saw us roll into Southampton almost 3 minutes late.

The journey onwards from Southampton wasn’t logged but we called at Brockenhurst and then  all stations to Bournemouth, where we were relieved. After being relieved, the usual routine was to walk back down the platform, to the London end, where there was a BRSA club. A couple of pints of brown and mild, a Cornish pastie and agame of bar billiards before crossing over to the up road for the back working. The back working, an ‘up fast’ from Weymouth, was almost always a Merchant Navy, and a very different run altogether, of which, more later.

Sadly, No.34022 Exmoor, wasn’t one of the survivors and the photo shows No.34053 Sir Keith Park getting into her stride after departing from Quorn & Woodhouse station on the Great Central Railway. I did work on No.34053 Sir Keith Park but I don’t have access to the details of any of my runs with her.

My thanks to Terry Jackson whose log of the run I made with 34022 Exmoor on 02 / 01 / 1965, between Waterloo and Southampton, was used to provide the details of the trip recounted above.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Down stopper – back fast

One Saturday, early in January 1965, I was booked on a regular three link duty, the 08.35 Waterloo – Weymouth stopper. It was a turn where you might get a Merchant Navy, West Country, or even a BR class 5 Standard. On the day our engine was No.34022 Exmoor and we left Waterloo with 11 on for 395 tons gross. Our first stop was Surbiton and we arrived 50 seconds late, we pulled into Woking, our next stop, 25 seconds to the good.

The 08.35 down wasn’t a flyer but, we did have a bit of fun accelerating all the way, from our start out of Working, to the summit at MP31 which we passed at 54mph – we kept up a pretty even mid seventies all the way from Farnborough to Hook where we were stopped by signals.  However, despite being brought to a dead stand we still rolled into Basingstoke only 38 seconds adrift.

Twenty four minutes was the time allowed from Basingstoke to Winchester – we passed Wallers Ash box at over 80mph arriving in   Winchester a shade over two minutes early. After leaving Winchester things carried on in much the same style and we went through Eastleigh nudging 70 and nearly a minute up. It wasn’t to last, signal checks between St Denys and Northam Jct. saw us roll into Southampton almost 3 minutes late.

The journey onwards from Southampton wasn’t logged but we called at Brockenhurst and then  all stations to Bournemouth, where we were relieved. After being relieved, the usual routine was to walk back down the platform, to the London end, where there was a BRSA club. A couple of pints of brown and mild, a Cornish pastie and agame of bar billiards before crossing over to the up road for the back working. The back working, an ‘up fast’ from Weymouth, was almost always a Merchant Navy, and a very different run altogether, of which, more later.

Sadly, No.34022 Exmoor, wasn’t one of the survivors and the photo shows No.34053 Sir Keith Park getting into her stride after departing from Quorn & Woodhouse station on the Great Central Railway. I did work on No.34053 Sir Keith Park but I don’t have access to the details of any of my runs with her.

My thanks to Terry Jackson whose log of the run I made with 34022 Exmoor on 02 / 01 / 1965, between Waterloo and Southampton, was used to provide the details of the trip recounted above.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Turning back the clock

When the future’s uncertain, there’s always the past. Mourning for what has gone, disparaging its replacement. It was better then, it’s dreadful now. Nowt wrong wi canals, why would thi want to be rushin around at 30 miles an hour, I don’t know how they manage to breathe at that speed – it’s all a matter of perspective.

2017 saw numerous galas and events, at quite a few of the major heritage lines, commemorating the end of Southern steam, in 1967. 2017 was also 70 years since the Big Four, LNER / LMS / SR / GWR, were Nationalised but, I don’t recall any major gala commemorating their demise. And to date, I haven’t spotted any events to mark the creation of British Railways, in theory at least, a more important event than the end of Southern steam, in so far as it was an Act of Parliament, rather than simply an operational objective in the modernisation of the railway network.  What we remember and what is commemorated or celebrated, from the past, are two very different things.

There’s even a certain degree of irony here too because, despite the rhetoric, the re-privatisation of the railways, which was sold on ‘nostalgic images and iconography’ drawn from the days of the Big Four, has been a far cry from what was promised in the sell off prospectus. And there is now, in 2018, a high level of public support for the re-Nationalisation of the railway network and the slim, but growing, possibility it might happen.

Cycling Lion anyone?

The photo is of 8F No.48624, with a train of mineral empties, passing Quorn & Woodhouse signal box, on the Great Central Railway.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

 

 

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2017 A personal review

A year of firsts and farewells, though for me 2017 was the year of the ‘End of Southern Steam’; an event celebrated, if that’s the right word, at quite a few heritage lines; and I very much enjoyed seeing Nos. 34081 92 Squadron and 34053 Sir Keith Park, at the Great Central Railway’s offering.  There was even a brief glimpse of No.73156 running as No.73084 Tintagel, like Nos. 34081 and 34053, another engine I’d worked on back in the 60s.

No.73156 / 73084 was one of the firsts too, as she was making her debut appearance after being rescued from Dai Woodhams yard in Barry and restored to operational condition at Loughborough. Sadly, teething problems with the brakes curtailed her official workings, to just one passenger turn on the first day of the gala.

Earlier, in February, there was a bold experiment on the Settle & Carlisle line with No.60163 Tornado hauling regular service trains, for a 3 day spell, between Skipton and Appleby. There were two runs each day and I managed to photograph the first return working, at Selside, on Valentine’s Day. No.60163 also set a first, being given a trial run at 100mph on the ECML, a thrill for all concerned, I’m sure. The data being gathered was intended to support the case for raising the speed limit for steam, on the main line, from 75mph to 90mph.

Sticking with the main line theme, 2017 saw the S&C officially re-opened, after major repairs, with a run behind No.60103 Flying Scotsman, to Carlisle and the S&C also saw main line stalwart, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, bow out when her boiler ticket expired in August – she is pictured at the top of the article, at Kirkby Stephen station , on her last run over the S&C.

No.60103 Flying Scotsman, crossing Lunds viaduct, on the S&C.

Being a Leeds lad I’m rather fond of the Scots which, for many years, were the principal express engines on the former LMS / MR /LNWR routes in and out of the City. In line to replace her, out on the main line, is another engine steaming for the first time since being saved from the scrap yard, No.35018 British India Line, and again one of the engines I have fired on passenger services, out of Waterloo, in the 60s.

Continuing the Southern theme, I never worked on the Schools, though there were several in store at 70A when I started there. 2017 saw Schools Class, No.926 Repton, return to traffic on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, following her ten year overhaul. She is pictured above, slogging up the last half mile of the steep climb from Grosmont to Goathland during the NYMR gala.

On a personal note, I made my first ever visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, a little gem in the midst of some wonderful scenery. The locomotive in the photograph is, Sir Tom, a Bagnall 0-4-0ST of 1926 vintage. Sir Tom was employed at BICC in Kent until 1968 and moved to Threlkeld in 2001. Sir Tom was overhauled and rebuilt at Threlkeld and re-entered traffic in 2010.

As the year drew to a close it was farewell to Black 5 No.44806 at the NYMR and No.7812 Erlestoke Manor at the Severn Valley. No.61994 The Great Marquess, and shortly No.60009 Union of South Africa, are to become museum exhibits, no longer gracing the main lines and flying a flag for the LNER, which is sad, especially as the locomotives, of constituents of the LNER, are few in number when compared with the other members of the Big Four.

Not to end on sour note No.7812 Erlestoke Manor, pictured above approaching Bewdley tunnel with a Bridgnorth – Kidderminster service, is to have a fast track overhaul and is expected back by 2020. Good progress is being made with the new build No.82045, a project of which I’m a keen supporter. The 82xxxs were great fun to work on and the ideal engine for a heritage railway operation. I’m very much looking forward to seeing and photographing the finished item.

All of you, I’m sure, have your own highlights from 2017 and I could have added a few more of my own, seeing the Steam Elephant in operation at Beamish was a treat, as was having the Tanfield Railway just 15 minutes drive away, and I leave you with one of my favourite shots from Tanfield in 2017.

Keighley Gasworks No.2, with Bobgins cabin in the background, is heading for Andrews House with a train from East Tanfield.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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A brief review of my 2017 in words and pictures.

A year of firsts and farewells, though for me 2017 was the year of the ‘End of Southern Steam’; an event celebrated, if that’s the right word, at quite a few heritage lines; and I very much enjoyed seeing Nos. 34081 92 Squadron and 34053 Sir Keith Park, at the Great Central Railway’s offering.  There was even a brief glimpse of No.73156 running as No.73084 Tintagel, like Nos. 34081 and 34053, another engine I’d worked on back in the 60s.

No.73156 / 73084 was one of the firsts too, as she was making her debut appearance after being rescued from Dai Woodhams yard in Barry and restored to operational condition at Loughborough. Sadly, teething problems with the brakes curtailed her official workings, to just one passenger turn on the first day of the gala.

Earlier, in February, there was a bold experiment on the Settle & Carlisle line with No.60163 Tornado hauling regular service trains, for a 3 day spell, between Skipton and Appleby. There were two runs each day and I managed to photograph the first return working, at Selside, on Valentine’s Day. No.60163 also set a first, being given a trial run at 100mph on the ECML, a thrill for all concerned, I’m sure. The data being gathered was intended to support the case for raising the speed limit for steam, on the main line, from 75mph to 90mph.

Sticking with the main line theme, 2017 saw the S&C officially re-opened, after major repairs, with a run behind No.60103 Flying Scotsman, to Carlisle and the S&C also saw main line stalwart, No.46115 Scots Guardsman, bow out when her boiler ticket expired in August – she is pictured at the top of the article, at Kirkby Stephen station , on her last run over the S&C.

No.60103 Flying Scotsman, crossing Lunds viaduct, on the S&C.

Being a Leeds lad I’m rather fond of the Scots which, for many years, were the principal express engines on the former LMS / MR /LNWR routes in and out of the City. In line to replace her, out on the main line, is another engine steaming for the first time since being saved from the scrap yard, No.35018 British India Line, and again one of the engines I have fired on passenger services, out of Waterloo, in the 60s.

Continuing the Southern theme, I never worked on the Schools, though there were several in store at 70A when I started there. 2017 saw Schools Class, No.926 Repton, return to traffic on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, following her ten year overhaul. She is pictured above, slogging up the last half mile of the steep climb from Grosmont to Goathland during the NYMR gala.

On a personal note, I made my first ever visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, a little gem in the midst of some wonderful scenery. The locomotive in the photograph is, Sir Tom, a Bagnall 0-4-0ST of 1926 vintage. Sir Tom was employed at BICC in Kent until 1968 and moved to Threlkeld in 2001. Sir Tom was overhauled and rebuilt at Threlkeld and re-entered traffic in 2010.

As the year drew to a close it was farewell to Black 5 No.44806 at the NYMR and No.7812 Erlestoke Manor at the Severn Valley. No.61994 The Great Marquess, and shortly No.60009 Union of South Africa, are to become museum exhibits, no longer gracing the main lines and flying a flag for the LNER, which is sad, especially as the locomotives, of constituents of the LNER, are few in number when compared with the other members of the Big Four.

Not to end on sour note No.7812 Erlestoke Manor, pictured above approaching Bewdley tunnel with a Bridgnorth – Kidderminster service, is to have a fast track overhaul and is expected back by 2020. Good progress is being made with the new build No.82045, a project of which I’m a keen supporter. The 82xxxs were great fun to work on and the ideal engine for a heritage railway operation. I’m very much looking forward to seeing and photographing the finished item.

All of you, I’m sure, have your own highlights from 2017 and I could have added a few more of my own, seeing the Steam Elephant in operation at Beamish was a treat, as was having the Tanfield Railway just 15 minutes drive away, and I leave you with one of my favourite shots from Tanfield in 2017.

Keighley Gasworks No.2, with Bobgins cabin in the background, is heading for Andrews House with a train from East Tanfield.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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All the best for 2018

70 years ago British Railways came into being and 50 years ago they called a halt to regular steam hauled services. On the 8th & 9th of June 1948, Bulleid Light Pacific No.34006 Bude, as part of the hastily arranged ‘Locomtive Exchange Trails’  worked over the Great Central Railway route between Marylebone and Manchester London Road, working north on the 8th and returning south on the 9th. Cecil J. Allen decribed her perfomance as, ‘amazing’.

2017 saw the usual crop of farewells and returns to steam, and I’m sure we all have our favourites in both categories. I enjoyed seeing, and hearing, the last few runs of No.46115 Scots Guardsman over the S&C route, she certainly bowed out in style. In the fresh from scrapyard condition, I was very much looking forward to the return of No.35018 British India Line, an engine I worked on in the 1960s – I’ve seen the videos but, yet to see her, in the flesh. A treat for 2018 I hope.  Winner of the fresh from overhaul prize is the engine in the photograph above, B-o-B Class 4-6-2 No.34081 92 Squadron, pictured shortly after departing from Loughborough.

One of No.46115 Scots Guardsman’s last runs, at Aisgill, earlier in 2017.

Over the last 50 years I have visited lines all over Britain and in Europe but, a first for me in 2017 was a visit to the narrow gauge system at Threlkeld Quarry, and what a charming place it is, like Arnie ‘I’ll be back’.

All that remains now is to wish everyone a very happy and prosperous New Year and leave you with the knowledge that our hobby, it would seem, is in good hands.If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

 

 

 

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Old rivals

In the West country there was a great deal of rivalry between the London & South Western and the GWR, especially over the Atlantic traffic and in 1906 an accident at Salisbury, to a non-stop Plymouth – Waterloo Atlantic liner service, in which 28 people were kiled, led the London & South Western, subsequently, to stop all London bound trains at Salisbury. There was a stop for an engine change at Templecombe, but not for passengers, prior to this.

A couple of years earlier, in 1904, it was on one of the GWR’s Trans-Atlantic services that the did she didn’t she reach 100mph saga with No.3440 City of Truro began. After 1906 and the opening of the Reading – Taunton route the GWR had the advantage of a more direct route than the one via Bristol; and there have been some suggestions that the driver of the LSWR express, in 1906, had been trying to prove that they could still compete. However, there is little direct evidence to support this.

In my own time on the Southern, during the 1960s, I worked an LCGB rail tour from Waterloo to Exeter and back which was booked to run non-stop Waterloo to Yeovil and Yeovil to Waterloo. We did run through Salisbury on the down run but, on the return we were checked by signals as we approached. The non-stop running was a ‘special dispensation’ and we had a footplate inspector, Arthur Jupp, along with us all the way there and back.  The driver was ‘Spot’ King and our engine was No.35022 Holland-America Line.

The photograph shows B-o-B Class 4-6-2 No.34053 Sir Keith Park at Kinchley Lane, during the Great Central Railway’s ‘Southern Gala’ earlier this year.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Until New Year the eBook edition of Gricing is on offer at just £3:95, that’s a whole book for less than a monthly mag.

 

 

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And we wish you ……

Well here we are again, steaming into yo, ho, ho, and for some lucky folk, this week, sun, steam, and yo, ho, snow. We are also rapidly approaching the 70th anniversary of the birth of British Railways, on 01/01/1948. How different things were back then, very few had tv, computers were the size of a house and there were, probably, no more than a handful in the entire country; most people didn’t have a phone, and a mobile phone was pure science fiction.

The first objective for BR was to complete the repairs to the war ravaged network and catch up on the regular maintenance programme which had been almost abadonded during the war. Life expired and war damaged rolling stock and locomotives needed replacing; on top of these practical considerations was the need to bring together the management and operations of the four, nominally, competing companies into one publicly owned corporation.

When the newly Nationalised railway opened for business R A Riddles was sitting in what was, in effect, the CME’s chair, assisted by E S Cox and R Bond, this trio were responsible for the creation of British Railways ‘Standard’ classes. Riddles railway life began at Crewe, in the days of the LNWR, he rose to become principal assistant to Stanier at the  LMS, and in 1943, on secondement to the Ministry of Supply, he designed his 2-8-0 and 2-10-0 ‘Austerities’ – the forerunner to the 9Fs, one of which, No.92214, is pictured above departing from Loughborough.

Despite being ‘standard’ the 9Fs had their share of modifications, some were fitted with Franco-Crosti boilers, and then they weren’t, some were fitted with mechanical stokers, several more had air pumps fitted for working the Tyne Dock – Consett iron ore hoppers and No.92250, the last in the class, was fitted with a Giesel ejector. The 9Fs were built between 1954 and 1960, by  July 1964 Nos. 92169,70,71,75,76,77, which, in 1960 were all allocated to 36A Doncaster, had all been withdrawn.  In 1960 No.92214 was a Banbury engine and, in all probability, worked trains on this very line when she was – ironic really when you think she has spent more time in service on heritage railways than she did on British Railways.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Until New Year the eBook edition of Gricing is on offer at just £3:95, that’s a whole book for less than a monthly mag.

 

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Christmas Special

From Friday 1st of December, until New Years Day, the e-book version of Gricing is at the Special Offer Price of £3:95

“Gricing” – 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing: Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

By Amazon Customer on 17 Mar. 2016

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase

“Not a murder mystery, but one that I found hard to put down. One of the best additions to my collection of books about railways.”

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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A Jinty in dreamland

The sub-title to my blog is Trains of thought, and who would have dreamed, in 1960, that a bunch of kids, mostly, would go on to create a network of heritage railways from Aviemore to Bodmin and Gwili to Sheringham, re-create a working, twin-track, main line railway, and run regular steam hauled services on the national network.  And that  50 years on they would be a major part of the nation’s tourist infrastructure, as they undoubtedly are.

2018 is going to be a year of great ballyho for the 50th Anniversary of the ‘End of Steam’ and not a little personal reflection on the end of my own railway career too. The white heat of technology was going to bring us a bright new future and we should embrace it. We’ve swapped our Box Brownies for Digital SLR and Camcorders and exchanged the land line telephone for Google and the internet; and 50 years ago no one dreamed of those things either.

My very first footplate journey, whilst still a schoolboy, was on a Jinty, my last, as a steam fireman, was on a WD; in between was an eclectic mix of motive power, MPDs and routes worked. Being a fireman was a challenge, it was down to you to produce the steam. Opening the regulator of a steam locomotive is not the same as opening the controller on a diesel or electric locomotive where the available power is pre-determined; on a steam locomotive the skill of the fireman determines what level of power, up to the engines full capability, is available. The challenge is to keep as near as possible to maximum pressure without excessive blowing off and, with so many variables involved in doing so, it is a great deal more difficult than most people imagine, or should I say dream.

In the photograph No.47406 is drifting towards Loughborough, on the Great Central Railway, with a train of empty mineral wagons.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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