Tag Archives: goods

Summer Special

July only – enjoy Gricing for less. From July 1st to 31st the Ebook version of Gricing is on special offer at just £3.99

Here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children-ebook/dp/B011D1WBWY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

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A little 8F – ing

Double-entende and railway slang have much in common and there’s no shortage of words and phrases from the railway lexicon to be found in common parlance – from a desire to ‘polish those buffers’ to ‘hitting’ them, and ‘building up a head of steam’, well you get the intention. I kept hearing an LMS whistle, blowing on the breeze but, until the 8F burst from Shotlock Tunnel I had know idea which of the possible locomotives it was, though I did know it wasn’t British India Line, or something LNER.

My previous visit to the Settle – Carlisle line was two weeks ago, when No.45690 Leander was ‘running out of puff’ and, as a result, behind schedule. Today, however, No.48151 was a few minutes ahead of time and ‘going like a train’. Speaking of which, that master of innuendo George Formby used to do a little number called the ‘Wigan Boat Express’ – an entirely fictional train service. A couple of lines will serve to give you the gist: “A chap one day with a girl got gay, I saw them both caress. She got what for in the corridor on the Wigan Boat Express.” (Formby, G.) Moving swiftly on, this song could not have been written about a train liason today, what with the open saloon and a distinct lack of corridors. Perhaps, this is the moment to draw a veil over the steamy proceedings.

The photo shws No.48151 emerging from Shotlock Tunnel, close to Aisgill summit, with the ‘Dalesman’ Chester – Carlisle excursion.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

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The Leg Ends of Industry

This weekend was the Tanfield Railway’s Legends of Industry Gala and, on Sunday morning, the two visiting engines, Ex-CEGB, Dunston Power Station RSH 0-4-0ST No.15 and former NCB No.2 Durham Area, (Lambton Railway),  Hunslet ‘Austerity’ 0-6-0ST No.60, are side by side at Andrews House Station.

No.15 was built in Newcastle and spent her entire working life there, in Dunston Power Station. No.60 was built in Leeds, in 1948, and was the first new locomotive supplied to the recently created NCB Durham Area No.2. In 1962 she was fitted with a mechanical stoker, removed in 1967,  at the Lambton workshops before she went to Dawdon Colliery; where she remained, until being withdrawn in 1974 and moved, eventually, to the Strathspey Railway at Aviemore.

Between turns, No.60 stands alongside No.20 outside Marley Hill shed; this 1850s engine shed, still doing what it was built for, is having repairs to the gable end and new doors have been fitted, all the work being carried out by the volunteers. Down at East Tanfield a brand new carriage shed is taking shape; and all the new track work associated with it has also been done by the volunteers. And all this is going on whilst organising and running the gala – everything from stringing up the bunting to handing out Flyers, transporting engines across the country, ensuring a goodly supply of tea and buns for the visitors and directing traffic in the car park, (well done to Colin Fish for this little chore).

No.60 arriving at East Tanfield earlier in the week – the NCB lettering on the tanks was just another of those little jobs on the ‘to do list’ before the gala began. TV crews covered the arrival and the gala with a nice little piece being shown on the local news, in which yours truly was to be seen, though I had no idea I was!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The last batch

On the Western Section of British Railways Southern Region the discs, being carried by 75078, indicated a West of England service to Salisbury and Exeter. And these engines were a common sight on stopping trains out of Waterloo over this route, during my own time working on this line, in the mid-1960s. In fact, No.75078, was an engine I worked on quite a number of times on stopping passenger duties and on freight jobs, like the ‘banana trains’ from Southampton to Nine Elms Goods.

The last batch to be built, No.75065 – 75079 were allocated to the Southern, from new. They were  all eventually fitted with a double-chimney and all of them were coupled to the large BRIB tenders with a 4,725 gallon water capacity, because of the Southern’s lack  of troughs. Initially shared between Dover on the Eastern section and Exmouth Junction on the Western, many of them ended their days at Eastleigh. My 1961 Shed Book shows 2 on the books at Stewarts Lane, and 3 at Bath Green Park, which was, by then, under the Western Region of BR. On the right of the picture is Ex-S&DJR 2-8-0 7F No.53808, also of Bath Green Park, unfortunately the 75xxxs allocated to Bath, in 1961, were Nos. 75071 /2 /3, not No.75078 which was a Guildford engine and she is still carrying the 70D Guildford shed plate.

And you know that old chestnut – ‘there’s always one’ well No.75071 was withdrawn, in 1967, from Stoke. Nos.75072 & 3 were the only others from this batch not to end their days at Eastleigh; probably as a result of their posting, earlier, at Bath Green Park, both being withdrawn from Yeovil in December 1965. Amazingly 3 of this final batch survived into preservation, No.75069 is nearing the end of a major overhaul at the Severn Valley Railway, No.75079 is also under overhaul at the Mid-Hants Railway and as can be seen No.75078 is working well on the K&WVR.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Express Freight

At the beginning of the 19thCentury the turnpikes were a mess, the canals were slow, and moving large consignments of goods was fraught, time consuming, and possibly ruinous. The movement of large quantities of coal and other minerals was similarly problematic – the solution, as we all know, was the railway. Was it inevitable, that like the turnpike and the canal, the railway would have its day? Would some newer and more radical solution, to the mass movement of goods and people, be forthcoming. Thus far the answer would seem to be a resounding no.

Railway networks are still expanding, closed routes are being re-opened and newer and faster forms of propulsion are being used on them. In the case of the Maglev they no longer run on wheels but levitate above the track on a powerful magnetic field, which is also part of the means of propulsion. If this seems an awful long way from Stephenson’s Rocket, you’re right it is.  When Stephenson was building engines the properties of electromagnetism were still waiting for Michael Faraday to uncover them.  And it wasn’t until 1838, 180 years ago, this year, that Messers. Cooke and Wheatstone put these newfangled forces to work in their telegraph system, first installed on the GWR, in 1838, between Paddington and West Drayton.

The electric telegraph and the block system became the backbone of the safe movement of trains on the railway, and in one guise or another it still is. If you thought it was a long way from ‘Rocket’ to Maglev it’s an even longer one from the Bobby controlling the movement of trains, with his watch and his flag, standing by the tracks, to today’s Train Protection Warning System and computer controlled signals operated from Regional Operating Centres – not lineside signal boxes.

The photo shows Ex-LMS 4-6-0 Class 5MT No.44871, approaching Ingrow, with a recreation freight working during the K&WVR’s Spring Gala.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

 

 

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The driver, the guard, and the mail bag catcher.

The humble 0-6-0 tank engine, guards van in tow, could be seen anywhere from bucolic country branch lines to a colliery siding in Barnsley. And the first recorded 0-6-0, ‘Royal George’, built by Timothy Hackworth, for the Stockton & Darlington Railway, in 1827, is credited, by some commentators, with ensuring the success of steam haulage on the S&D, which, at the time, was said to be ‘in the balance’.

These ‘Fowler’ LMS Class 3F, 0-6-0Ts are, essentially, updates of an earlier Midland Railway design of Samuel Waite Johnson, the 2441 Class, introduced in 1899. The ‘Jinties’, as they are commonly and collectively known, were introduced in 1924 and many of them were built by private contactors. The Hunselt Engine Co. built 90, the North British Locomotive Co. made 75, and Vulcan Foundry constructed 120, including No.47406, in 1926.

WG Bagnall was another one of the private companies given an order to build the 3Fs,  seven of which, in 1929,  went to the Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway – S&DJR Nos. 19 – 25, in 1930 they were absorbed into LMS stock. And, in one of those you learn something new everyday moments, I discovered that 90 Jinties were built by William Beardmore & Co. a Glasgow ship building corporation.

Nine Jinties made it into preservation 4 from Vulcan Foundries, 3 of the North British ones and 2 of the Hunslets but, the Bagnalls and all the Beardmore’s bit the dust; as did the last 15 of the Class, built at Horwich works, in 1931. Quite a number of the preserved examples have run in the past but, currently No.47406 is the only operational Jinty. No.47298 and 47324 are ‘under overhaul’ at Rileys and the ELR with No. 47324 being expected back later this year or early in 2019 as is No.47298 – watch this space, as they say.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Heading for Yorkshire

There isn’t another locomotive in preservation which raises the controversy that No.60103 Flying Scotsman does. Everything from the shade of green to the ‘German’ style smoke deflectors has its share of supporters and detractors and we haven’t mentioned money or how much of what is before your eyes is ‘the real Flying Scotsman’ or the ‘Flying Money Pit’ as some refer to it.

In all the heated debate we some how seem to have lost sight of the simple pleasures which brought us to our hobby – watching, listening to and enjoying the smell of passing steam engines, taking their numbers, or their pictures as we did so. It must have been quite a treat for spotters along the S&C during the early 1960s when, in addition to their daily diet of LMS locos, the A3s were appearing regularly on the ‘Waverley’ and other Edinburgh – London St. Pancras services, south of Carlisle.

In the summer of 1960 Holbeck was already home to several A3s including Nos.60038 Firdaussi, No.60077 The White Knight,  and No. 60080 Dick Turpin which was one of the few not named after race horses, ‘Flying Scotsman’ was, of course, another, though she wasn’t  a Holbeck engine. Several more A3s, mostly from Gateshead, ended up in Leeds when they were cascaded down from the East Coast Main Line, as the Deltics and Type 4s took over. Some of the last A3s to be withdrawn were those shedded at Carlisle Canal, which spent their final days working freight services over the Waverley line to Edinburgh. One of them, No.60100 Spearmint, when she was at Haymarket, in her heyday, was the regular engine of the footplate author, driver Norman McKillop, aka Toram Beg, who wrote for Trains illustrated.

McKillop wrote the excellent, ‘Lighted Flame a History of ASLEF’, as well as a column in the Locomotive Journal, though he is probably better known for his writings about footplate work and life for a more general audience in books like, ‘Enginemen Elite’ and ‘Ace Enginemen’.

The photo shows No.60103 Flying Scotsman at Birkett Common, if I’m permitted an opinion I’d loose the German blinkers and the rest is just fine. However, I do think they looked very handsome in Apple Green with a single chimney.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The ‘starred’ 8F

Tuesday’s Dalesman was again in the hands of the ‘starred’ 8F No.48151, and she is seen here northbound, at Langcliffe, just a couple of miles beyond Settle Junction.  Built at Crewe in 1942 No.48151 spent her first seven years at Grangemouth before becoming a Canklow engine in 1949, where, apart from a brief spell at Wellingborough, she remained until 1962 – I very much doubt that she saw much by way of passenger duties at either location. Somewhat more surprising is that ‘in preservation’ she has worked freight trains, a stone hopper train from  Ribblehead quarry over the S&C to Carlisle and at Tunstead quarry during a short spell on loan there.

Canklow, 19C later 41D, (Rotherham), opened in 1875 and closed to steam in 1965 and the nearest I could find to a passenger engine, on the books, was a ‘Flying Pig’ No.43037 which spent quite some time there in the 1950s and 60s. At Grangemouth No.48151 would have been rubbing shoulders with WD 2-10-0s and ancient Ex-Caledonian Railway Drummond, Pickersgill, and McIntosh 0-6-0s, like the 1899 vintage, McIntosh 3F, No.828, (BR No.57566), which is still running on the Strathspey Railway.

Grangemouth was one of the Scottish sheds I visited during a round Scotland track and shed bash in 1964, not the most accessible spot to reach using public transport, like Thornton Jct., which was another one on the list we visited. I had my one and only footplate trip on an A4 during this tour, riding on No.60026 Miles Beevor from Aberdeen up to Stonehaven – a very different experience from the Bulleid Pacifics I was working on, out of Waterloo. Quite what the Aberdeen men made of me I don’t know, the fireman was old enough to be my dad and the driver my grandad!

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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From main line to minerals

After a star-studded career on the main line Britannia Class 4-6-2, No.70013 Oliver Cromwell, is seen here hauling 9S10 the 10:20 Loughborough – Swithland ‘windcutter’ / ‘runner’ re-enactment, during the Great Central Railway’s Goods Galore Gala, on Saturday last.

When steam was on its way out engines which were once the pride of the fleet could be seen, often in filthy condition, performing all manner of lesser turns and duties – as above. The question was raised, about my previous post, did we really need the ‘Standards’, of all classes. They began to appear in 1951 and all of them were withdrawn by 1968, some of them went to scrap at less than 10 years old. It matters little which side of the political divide you’re on – this is a criminal waste, by any standard.

The twenty years between 1948 when BR was born and 1968 when steam was finally withdrawn, were twenty years of missed opportunities, poor decision making, botched planning and, for much of that time, a government antipathetic to the very idea of Nationalisation.  This is hardly a recipe for success and successes were thin on the ground. Did the railway need new classes and designs, probably not. If more locomotives were needed, until the network could be ‘electrified’, it would have made more sense to build additional locos of pre-existing classes – Black 5 or Std 5?

In my own railway career I witnessed the debacle unfolding, at the blunt end. The dereliction, decay, and loss of morale, the queues of trucks blocking the roads, no motorways then, not to mention the failures of the new fangled diesels but, the badly run down and poorly mainted steam fleet too.

On that note the S&C beckons, so it’s not all doom and gloom.

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“What’s your favourite”

‘What’s your favourite’ is usually followed by engine or livery but, in this instance it’s, what’s your favourite train? There are all the usual suspects, Caledonian, Red Dragon, Talisman, Atlantic Coast Express, or the Devon Belle but, in my case, it’s none of the above.  My favourite is not only not a named service, it’s not even an express, it’s the ‘paper train’. A couple of coaches for the intrepid travellers and a dozen or more vans with tomorrow’s head lines and the day after’s chip wrappers.

I not only loved to travel on the paper trains, I equally enjoyed working on them. During the 60s as a fireman at 70A,  I worked regularly, on the Bulleid Pacifics, hauling paper trains out of Waterloo.  Just like the TPO, the newspapers were sorted and bundled on the train as we sped through the dark heading for Bournemouth. The frantic last minute activity with newspaper vans, from Fleet Street, still arriving just minutes before the off – the final, final editions. There’s something about the footplate of a Bulleid at night, the glow of the fire, the humming of the Stones generator powering the gauge glass and cab lights, the smell of wet wood and steam after you swilled round with the slacker pipe.

There were other little pleasures too, watching the sun coming up as we went through the New Forest and seeing the deer darting through the mist, swirling about the forest floor, startled by our approach. My favourite journey on one was out of Kings Cross in the mid-70s. Having boarded the train I opened the door to a compartement which had the blinds down and was greeted by the single occupant –  ‘come in take yer boots off and fart a bit, we don’t want anyone else joining us.’  My fellow traveller turned out to be something of a raconteur and his choice of greeting had been the result of his reading Lenny Bruce’s ‘How to talk dirty and influence people’. It seemed like no time and we were in Doncaster and my change of train.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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