Tag Archives: goods

The tiny tank engine

This tiny little Ex-NER  H Class 0-4-0, No.1310, is photographed at Moor Road, at the end of the Balm Road branch, on the Middleton Railway. Designed by T W Wordsell in 1888 twenty-four were built, nineteen at Gateshead and the rest at Darlington with the last one being built in 1923 by the LNER. No 1310 was constructed in 1891 withdrawn in 1931 and sold to Robert Frazer & Sons. No.1310 was then sold to Pelaw Main Collieries and became part of the NCB in 1949, who renumbered her 63. In 1965, No.1310 was bought by the Steam Power Trust, and has been at the Middleton Railway pretty much ever since.

I know from my stats that these blogs have been viewed in over 130 countries and that over a ten day period, last month, every single one of them was seen by someone, or some group, in South Korea, which was odd. I will still be taking photographs and my portfolio can be seen here:  https://www.picfair.com/users/dropgrate

I will still be continuing to write; the last three parts of “In Memory”, my footplate memoire, will be appearing in 2019, with Part III planned for February and Parts IV and V at roughly 2 or 3 month intervals. Part II is available now, in print or as an ebook, at:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Memory-Part-II-David-Wilson/dp/1731324022/

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Time running and time passing

In less than two weeks Steam Age Daydreams will close – there are over 600 blogs and even more photographs on the web site – check them out before they all disappear into the ether. However, before they do I’m hoping to get to the GCR’s Last Hurrah event this weekend, so there may be a few fresh posts next week.

Part II of “In Memory”, the memoire of my  footplate days, is now available to download as an ebook – the paper back version will be available very shortly. The link to Part II is below. And below that is a link to Part I in case you haven’t read it yet.

I will still be passing my time photographing steam locomotives and for those of you who have enjoyed reading the Blog – I will be continuing to write, Part II of ‘In Memory’ is available now and parts III, IV and V will follow at intervals in the New Year.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Up ‘ill ‘n’ darn dale

In the 1960s, as a 15 year old, I learned how to fire steam locomotives working on Black 5s going from Leeds to Manchester and back.  This was very much an uphill and down dale route – which ever way you went you climbed the Pennines and then ran down the other side. A favourite turn, to take a ride out on, was the Red Bank vans, always double-headed, and often two of Farnley’s Black 5s.

There are two main line runs coming up which both remind me of my time on the footplate. The first, this Saturday, is the ‘Citadel’ booked for double-headed Black 5s and working from Manchester to Carlisle via the S&C, crossing and recrossing the Pennines. The second run is next month’s ‘Pennine Moors Explorer’ which reminds me of my time at Wakefield in the final days of steam and working over Copy Pit with wheezing clanking Dubdees and train loads of coal, returning whence we came with the empties.

The Pennine Moors Explorer might even be hauled by an engine I actually worked on whilst I was a fireman at Nine Elms – No.34046 Braunton, which would be wonderful to see, and hear, it’s quite a pull from Todmorden through Cornholme and Portsmouth and on up to Copy Pit summit where, with the coal trains, we would have to stop and pin down wagon brakes for the long roll down to Gannow Junction.

Just as the lights went out on my railway career they will very soon be going out on Steam Age Daydreams too.

I will still be passing my time photographing steam locomotives and for those of you who have enjoyed reading the Blog – I will be continuing to write, Part II of ‘In Memory’ will be available before the end of the month with parts III, IV and V to follow at intervals in the New Year. If you’ve enjoyed my photographs the Steam Age Daydreams 2019 Calendar is now on sale on eBay – here’s the link: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302936132284

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Steam Age Daydreams 2019 Calendar is now on sale here’s the link:  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302936132284

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

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Engine and van

Some years back, I enjoyed a day out on one of the ‘terriers’, (Stepney), at the Bluebell Railway. I spent the day with Clive Groome,  one of my old drivers from Nine Elms days, running up and down between Sheffield Park  and Kingscote, engine and van.  When I was at Wakefield, just before the end of steam, running engine and van became more of a commonplace as more and more coal and goods traffic was going by road.

We had little pick-up goods turns where you visited goods yards, coal yards, and mill sidings all around the Wakefield area and across the GN to Bradford – this is how most of them began. The essential difference was that we were doing it with a clapped out old WD and with each passing week there were fewer and fewer wagons to collect or empties to deliver. One by one the mills were closing, the local goods yard, with the coal merchant and his staithes, the goods agent and his parcels, were shutting down too. We might have won the World Cup but, the railways, the mines, and the mills were losing the battles. Before much longer the lines we were travelling would shut too. The future was rust, weeds, vandalism, and graffiti – and then came the wrecking balls.

The photo is of No.662 (Martello) leaving Winchcombe, on the Gloucestershire & Warwickshire Railway, heading for Cheltenham.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Steam Age Daydreams 2019 Calendar is now on sale here’s the link:  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302929843008

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

 

 

 

 

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Blue Fish

Blue Fish isn’t some new internet business it’s the third van back, the one framed neatly by the lineside TPO apperatus.  Insulfish vans came in blue or  a grey white and fish trains were run ‘fast fitted’. On the East Coast the fish trains out of Aberdeen became the stuff of ‘legend’ and the Robinson Class 8 4-6-0s of the GCR were known throughout their working lives as ‘fish engines’. In the last days of steam on the WCML it was not unheard of to see the fish train in the hands of a Duchess.

My own experience of fish train working, circa 1966, was from Hull Docks to Healy Mills and our ‘Duchess’ was one of Wakefields finest Dubdees. My experience with the class 5 BR standards, like the one pictured, was mostly with passenger workings between Waterloo and points West. However, I did work several van trains from Southampton docks to Nine Elms goods with them, usually when the Union Castle line boats came in loaded with bananas.

Several years ago now I wrote a piece for the magazine Steam Days, all about working one of these ‘banana’ trains and, rather foolishly, eating green bananas. There’s a shortend version in the archives – ‘Bananas to the Beat’, if you want to read more.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

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Bongo on the mins

‘Who’s Oliver Bury’, I heard someone ask. He was Oliver Robert Hawke Bury, who was born in 1861 and died in 1946, before No.1251 was named in his honour. His first major railway posting was as CME for the Great Western Railway of Brazil. Bury began his railway life as an apprentice, under William Adams on the LSWR, in 1879 before emigrating to South America in 1892. Bury returned  to the UK in 1902 to take up the post of General Manager of the Great Northern.; eventually becoming a member of the Board of Directors on the LNER.

No1251 Oliver Bury, aka No.1264 / 61264, was the LNER entry in the 1948 Locomotive Exchange Trials. No.1251 Oliver Bury hauled the test train over the Midland route from St.Pancras to Manchester and return on the 15th and 18th of June 1948 and ran from Plymouth to Bristol on the 7th of July.

Above is the link to Part I of my memories of footplate life in the 1960s. The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway is still  available on Amazon – Below, is the link to that work.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

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Going off shed

The Great Central Railway autumn gala; Loughborough loco at 08:30 and the shed yard is a hive of activity. No. 70013 Oliver Cromewll, now in the last months of her boiler ticket, rolls towards the water column. Tank filled, she will run light to Rothley Brook and work the TPO set back to Loughborough.  A few minutes early the 9F had  gone off shed and was sat in the platform at Loughborough, waiting for the road, before moving off engine and van, also to Rothley Brook sidings.

The little BR mogul, No.78018, is already moving off shed, she was to have run down to Rothley Brook coupled to the LMS version, No.46521, but, for reasons unknown, No.46521 followed around fifeteen or twenty minutes later.  During the day I was listening to some chap telling us that there are plans to replace the existing Loughborough shed, a pretty basic corrugated affair, with a brick built engine shed of a more ‘traditional’ style MPD. Sounds nice and, as I understand that the present structure will have to move because of the reunification with the GCR (North), when the work on bridging the Midland Main Line is complete, it might well happen sooner rather than later.

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The Three Gricers

Bursting into the light at Beckhole, Schools Class 4-4-0 No.926 Repton is at the head of the 13:37 Grosmont – Goathland freight. Strangely, because of the pattern of No.926’s exhaust it almost looks as though the little narrow gauge engine, visiting from the Talyllyn Railway, No.6 Douglas, is acting as a banker: she’s actually on a flat wagon as part of the goods set. Sticking with strange and visiting engines; Ex-GWR 2-8-0 ‘heavy freight’ No.2857, visiting from the Severn Valley Railway, didn’t do one turn on the goods during the public timetable of the gala. In fact the bulk of the goods turns were completed by No.926 Repton.

I wonder what the ‘Public’ schools would have thought about an engine with their name on it being used to haul goods trucks, and one a cattle truck at that. I say this because when the engines were being built and named, during the early 1930s, at least one Public school objected to having their named attached to an engine;  No. 923 Uppingham  was renamed Bradfield after the school complained.

 

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Only a minor leak

Today’s photo from the NYMR’s autumn gala  shows Ex-NER 0-6-0  Class P3, LNER Class J27, No.2392 / BR No.65894 with a pretty decent freight working including a fish van, milk tank, cattle wagon, oil tank, and a narrow gauge engine on a flat wagon, in the train. No.65894  is doing her best to recreate steam’s final days  in the North-East with steam oozing everywhere from the front end.

Before you ask – I have no idea what the significance of the Blue Star is. However, there will be more from the NYMR gala later this week;  and a reminder that the first part of my memories of life on the footplate in the 1960s is now available, in print, or as an Ebook, which at £1.99 has to be a bargin.

Here’s the link to Part I : https://read.amazon.co.uk/kp/embed?linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_gOoNjfwj3yip64&asin=B07HMKTWMT&tag=kpembed-20&amazonDeviceType=A2CLFWBIMVSE9N&from=Bookcard&preview=inline

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Stanier’s 5

Now in LMS livery and looking very smart, Class 5 4-6-0 No.5428 is about to cross over the Goathland – Pickering road at Moorgates, close to the summit of the climb from Grosmont. With any locomotive engineer there is, understandably, a tendency to concentrate attention on their express engine designs. In Stanier’s case this is his Cornonation Class Pacifics and to a lesser extent his Princess Class. However, for my money his most succesfull locomotive was the one pictured here.

The Black 5 proved to be robust, reliable, a good steamer and loved by the crews who worked on them, myself included. They are well proportioned and uncluttered in their outline and, when called upon, had a fair turn of speed too.  I have seen timing logs of them deputising for A4s on the ‘Saint Mungo’ from Glasgow to Aberdeen and, to within seconds, keeping time. Their performances on some of the last steam services in the North West were the stuff of legend – the Belfast Boat Express became their star turn, in its latter days.

I can’t speak for others but, I’m looking forward to seeing a pair of them double-heading the ‘Citadel’ from Manchester to Carlisle and back on the 8th & 10th of next month.  I did work on the 5s between Leeds and Manchester and Leeds to Morecambe and you can read about my time on them in part 1 of my memories of  being a fireman in the last years of steam – here’s the link.

One happy customer commented – ‘Just read part 1 Enjoyed it – a lot.’

Here’s the link to Part I : https://read.amazon.co.uk/kp/embed?linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_gOoNjfwj3yip64&asin=B07HMKTWMT&tag=kpembed-20&amazonDeviceType=A2CLFWBIMVSE9N&from=Bookcard&preview=inline

 

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