Tag Archives: Barry

The Barry 5

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An almost intact No.35009 Shaw Savill makes a forlorn sight in the scrap line at Barry. In 1966, when these photographs were taken, I was a fireman at 56A Belle Vue (Wakefield), six months earlier I was at 70 A Nine Elms and working on these very engines. It was very strange, after working hundreds and hundreds of miles on their footplate, seeing them  sitting there, in Barry, awaiting their fate which, in May 1966, was a great deal  less than certain.

The other 4 of the ‘Barry 5’ photographs are all of West Country Class 4-6-2s. One of them is of No.34010 Sidmouth, which, for some reason, I seemed to get on the 08.35 Bournemouth duty, more than most. However, despite being ‘saved’ from the gas axe No.34010 Sidmouth is one of the ‘unrestored’ – for many years I watched her, rusting slowly, at the end of the head shunt at Grosmont MPD. This was before she was acquired by her latest owners Southern Locomotives, who, in 1997, moved her to  Sellindge  before moving her again, this time to their new base at Swanage. Southern Locomotives, according to the latest information I have, are  beginning her restoration, to running order, once they’ve finished work on No.34072 257 Squadron, which is due to be completed in the next couple of months or so.

The other 3 engines No. 34016 Bodmin, No.34028 Eddystone and No.34039 Boscastle, have all steamed in preservation. No.34028 has only recently run out of boiler ticket, No.34039 Boscastle is slowly making here way back, at Loughborough on the GCR, and No.34016 Bodmin is now awaiting overhaul at Carnforth.  And as for No.35009 Shaw Savill, well she is now a kit of parts at Ian Riley’s workshops in Bury; with a long term goal of restoration to main line condition – maybe, one day, she, like No.34010 Sidmouth, will steam again.

The photos of Nos.34010, 34016, 34028, and 34039, can all be seen here: http://steamagedaydreams.co.uk/?page_id=850

If you’ve enjoyed my photographs and blog, you might enjoy my book “Gricing: The Real story of the Railway Children”

These are some of the totally unsolicited comments from people who have read  Gricing:  ‘ treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’  ‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot.’  ‘ I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. – and from another ‘satisfied’ reader’ – ‘ I was given what I believe to be your book called Gricing the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!’

This is the link to my book “Gricing: The Real Story of the Railway Children.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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The Unknown Mogul

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Spent an hour putting some old photos in the scanner this morning,  all taken at Barry, 50 years ago this year. I have added them to the B&W photos page of Steam Age Daydreams. One of them, this one, is ‘unidentified’ – if anyone can shed light then please feel free. The other new additions include, amongst others, No. 34092 City of Wells, No.7903 Foremark Hall and one of my old nags, about to re-enter traffic, after fifty years, No.35006 Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co.

When you see the photos it is clear that the locomotives are fairly recent arrivals, most are only missing their rods and there’s very little evidence of the serious metal moth infestation which characterised the later years at Barry. There are no signs painted on smoke boxes or tenders saying, ‘sold to’ this that or any other group; freshly ‘withdrawn’ locomotives are still arriving to swell the ranks of those already there. This was how it was at Barry – in 1966, the year we won the Jules Rimet Trophy!!

This link will take you to the B&W photos page: http://steamagedaydreams.co.uk/?page_id=850

If you’ve enjoyed my photographs and blog, you might enjoy my book “Gricing: The Real story of the Railway Children”

These are some of the totally unsolicited comments from people who have read  Gricing:  ‘ treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’  ‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot.’  ‘ I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. – and from another ‘satisfied’ reader’ – ‘ I was given what I believe to be your book called Gricing the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!’

This is the link to my book “Gricing: The Real Story of the Railway Children.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Double heading and a Banker

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Autumn on the Worth valley and ‘Derby 4’, No.43924, pilots the visiting ‘Flying Pig’, No.43106, with an all stations from Keighley to Oxenhope service – pushing, at the rear, is Ivatt 2-6-2 No.41241, on her last gala appearance before overhaul. In a little under a week it will be the K&WVR’s Winter 2015 gala and No.43924, as one of the K&WVR resident locos, will be featuring in it.

Not the longest of preserved lines the K&WVR does, however, have quite a range of photographic locations from almost moorland settings above Haworth to gritty, old, stone buildings around Keighley. There’s a nice tunnel and viaduct at Mytholmes or a backdrop of trees as in the location in this photograph which is known as GN straight and I’m standing, almost, on the spot where the former Great Northern Railway line, from Keighley to Queensbury, for Halifax or Bradford, diverged. The GNR route, it is said, was expensive to maintain and it did have two tunnels and two major viaducts, on the roughly 10 mile long stretch, between Ingrow and Queensbury, how much impact these features had on its closure can only be guessed at. Opened throughout in 1884 it was closed in sections between 1956 and 1965.

1965 was the year No.43924 was sold to the famous Woodhams scrapyard at Barry in South Wales, five years later she was the first, of around 200 engines, to leave the yard and escape being cut up. Returned to traffic, in 2011, after a lengthy overhaul, No.43924 should still be ‘in ticket’ when her 100th birthday comes up in 2020.

If you've enjoyed this post, please feel free to share with friends, rail fans, or railway groups.

http://steamagedaydreams.co.uk/

You might also enjoy my ebook 'Gricing' which contains around 100 of my photos and 37,000 words, on all things railway, and the sales of which help to keep this blog running.

http://www.amazon.com/Gricing-real-story-Railway-Children-ebook/dp/B00ML0QYK2

or for British readers.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-real-story-Railway-Children-ebook/dp/B00ML0QYK2
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Heritage Railways – ‘The Next Generation’

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One of the more pleasing aspects of heritage railway galas is the willingness of the organisers to run non-revenue earning services, such as freight, minerals, or parcels/TPOs. In this photograph, No.5553 is at the head of a short ‘express freight’, approaching Crowcombe Heathfield on the West Somerset Railway.

No.5553 was one of, if not the last, locomotive(s) to leave the famous Woodham’s scrap yard in Barry, South Wales. Like many other railway enthusiasts I made a pilgrimage to Woodhams, 1965, in my case, and Dai Woodham has, quite rightly, been held in some degree of affection by many a railway fan. Without the Woodham’s legacy our current enjoyment of heritage railways would have been a very different affair.

Thirteen years after steam finished on BR, in 1981 / 2, sixty six engines were still in Woodhams yard – many of that number are, currently, or have, until recently, been running around. Here is a short list of some of the more notable ones No. 6023 King Edward II, 4953 Pitchford Hall, 34046 Braunton, 34070 Manston, 35006 Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation, 45337, 47406, 48305, 73096, 76084. Yes I know some of these engines are either out of ticket or not yet actually running, but we still have them and they have run, or will run, now or at some not too distant date.

Over the 50 years I have been visiting heritage lines, I have met railway enthusiasts from all over the world, Australia, Canada, the USA, and many from European countries, especially France, Holland, and Germany. A common theme in our conversations is how lucky we are, here in Britain, to have such a wide selection of engines, and the lines to run them on. I think it is equally important that our hobby is drawing in younger enthusiasts and volunteers, for without them and their enthusiasm, no matter how many engines we have or how many miles of track we have to run them on, us old timers are slowly running out of puff to do the hard work, track laying, lifting a piece of motion, and the dozens of other jobs requiring a fair degree of physical stamina to achieve. Well done you young guys & gals – as an old timer I salute you for your efforts and enthusiasm, to keep my hobby alive in the 21st Century.

The printed edition of “Gricing: The Real Story of the Railway Children” – is now on sale.

Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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