Tag Archives: 60163 tornado

Plandampf

For three days in February the clock is being turned back, sort of, to the end of steam on the S&C, back in the 60s. Northern Rail, the A1 Locomotive Trust, and the Settle Carlisle Railway have joined forces so that we will be able to enjoy the delights of No.60163 Tornado on regular service trains for 3 days in February. Operating between Skipton and Appleby, the first train leaves Appleby at 08:30 returning from Skipton at 10:45. The afternoon service departs Appleby at 15:07 and returns from Skipton at 17:10.

I don’t recall it myself but, I ‘m sure A1s, like their stable mates the A3s, did see the occasional turn hauling the Waverley over the Leeds – Carlisle leg, in the dog days of steam on the service. Quite what the ‘Midland’ men who had worked the service for decades with Scots and Jubilees thought of working on the A3s, or A1s, for that matter, is anyone’s guess.

One can only hope that all goes well with this three day Plandampf and that all concerned benefit from the experience – who knows it might encourage other operators, with scenic routes, to do something similar. On the other hand it might be a cunning, Baldrick style, plan to reintroduce steam by stealth as the nation’s motive power of choice. Restarting the coal mining industry, to supply them, might be a little trickier.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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A pig, and donkey !

43106donkey‘Flying Pig’, Ivatt Mogul No.43106, makes light work of Eardington bank, during the Severn Valley Railway’s Season Finale Gala. An eclectic line up of motive power, which included; GWR 2-8-0T No.4270, with a lovely train of GWR wagons, No.60163 Tornado with the blood and custard set, and the freshly out-shopped 0-6-0ST No.813, formerly Port Talbot Docks Railway No.26, make her gala debut. Ex-GWR 2-6-2T No.4566 was making her last gala appearance before her boiler ticket expires, the LMS liveried ‘Crab’,  No.13065, was hauling the SVR’s 1930’s vintage LMS stock, No. 7812 Erlestoke Manor made up the numbers whilst 0-4-2T, No.1450, panted up and down with the Auto train.

Back when railways were being invented the nay sayers proclaimed ‘it would ‘frighten the horses’ – the horse in this field scarcely noticed the Pig passing – even the sheep, out of shot, seemed utterly un-phased by the Pig’s passing. However, the gala itself was not without incident. On Friday, signalling issues caused problems, the Pig is actually running n the goods train path, the goods was caped. On Sunday, according to the information I was given, ‘a medical emergency’, at Highley, caused serious delays, more than an hour when I left for home. Despite the hiccups, and the occasional cloudy interludes, the Valley did provide some lovely colours and nice light.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing:  Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

By Amazon Customer on 17 Mar. 2016

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase

“Not a murder mystery, but one that I found hard to put down. One of the best additions to my collection of books about railways.”

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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A little draughty

60163moorgatesfsJust a bit of a breeze blowing as No.60163 Tornado heads out across the moors towards Fen Bog. When  I took and look at this photo I’m reminded of a Bob Dylan song ‘Girl from the North Country’ and the opening  verse which reads; ‘If you’re traveling in the north country fair Where the winds hit heavy on the borderline Remember me to one who lives there For she was once a true love of mine.’ (B.Dylan) The wind was definitely ‘hitting heavy on the borderline’ and railways have been my passion for more years than I care to count.

In Leeds, where I lived, the A1s were a common sight in the 1950s and early 60s. Copley Hill shed, which serviced and maintained the locomotives on the ‘East Coast’ route from Leeds to London, had 10, or thereabouts, on their allocation during that time. The A1s were often to be found at work on the important trains of the day, The Queen of Scots, the Yorkshire Pullman, and the White Rose were all turns they shared with A3s and A4s.

The A1s were another of those locomotive types built post-Nationalisation, they were built between 1948 and 1949, to have very short working lives, some lasted a mere 17 years pitifully short for a steam locomotive. The last to be withdrawn was No.60145 St. Mungo in 1966. However, despite their short career they were much missed by fans of the old LNER – with the result that a new one was built from scratch – No.60163 Tornado. The people who did so are now working on another of the LNERs engines a P2 class 2-8-2 – we can only wish them every success.

I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing: Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

By Amazon Customer on 17 Mar. 2016

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase

“Not a murder mystery, but one that I found hard to put down. One of the best additions to my collection of books about railways.”

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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Engines great and small

60163montrose

This will be the last post for the next couple of weeks, Steam Age Daydreams is having a holiday.

Some of my earliest memories of family holidays, in the 1950s, was boarding the train at Leeds Central Station and travelling to Lowestoft, changing trains in Peterborough and arriving in Lowestoft via Beccles and the Great Eastern. I remember the journey from Peterborough to Lowestoft taking longer than the run down the ECML. Though I do not have a precise memory of which locomotives pulled the trains, Copley Hill did have a decent allocation of A1s and it’s likely that we rode behind one, though obviously not the one in the photograph, the new build No.60163 Tornado, which is seen crossing Montrose basin

For me, at that time, Lowestoft had two major attractions, one was a boating lake, with electrically operated boats, a sort of dodgems on water and the other was a seafront railway with a Black 5 for motive power – here’s a link to some footage of the very train: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsm3AV4DjGA The locomotive has had quite a career and some of its history can be found here: http://www.stationroadsteam.co.uk/stock%20pages/5073/index.htm

For anyone interested, I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, on many levels, this is a link to it:  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

These are some totally unsolicited comments from people who have already read  Gricing: Amazon Customer on 6 Jan. 2016 Format: Paperback Verified Purchase:  “Brilliant and interesting book”

‘treated myself to a copy of “Gricing” for Christmas, excellent reading.’

‘I’m enjoying your book. It’s a real page-turner, thought provoking and great photos, to boot’

‘I bought and enjoyed “Gricing” etc and would heartily recommend it to readers’. 

‘I was given what I believe to be your book called “Gricing” the other night.  Very much enjoyed the book if it is yours!

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1st & last

60163&71000sseatsviasadd

‘The present now Will later be past’ …’ for the times they are a changin’ – these words were being sung by Bob Dylan, at a time, when I was a fireman on engines like these two ‘big beasts’ of the main line, the Pacifics, Bulleid’s in my case, on the LSWR routes to Weymouth and the West Country. In a curious way this photograph blurs the lines between past and present.

The class, to which the pilot engine would have been allocated, began construction in 1945, the train engine, No. 71000 Duke of Gloucester, was constructed in 1954. However, the pilot engine was actually put into traffic in 2008, not a rebuild of some scrapyard hulk, but a brand new, from the nuts up locomotive, albeit to the 1945 design by AH Peppercorn, with a few added mods to improve efficiency, safety and comply with current regulations.

No. 71000 Duke of Gloucester was not only rebuilt from a hulk but a hulk with some important bits ‘cut off’ by the gas axe, before her rescuers arrived.  Like No.60163 Tornado, No.71000 Duke of Gloucester, picked up some ‘mods’ which made her more efficient and improved her performance – you might say, that in the Duke’s case, ‘the past now has been made present’. Though in typical fashion, for all things railway, both locomotives are currently inactive, No. 60163 Tornado is under going a major overhaul and will be back. No. 71000 needs major repairs and her future is somewhat less than assured – maybe she’s on someone’s letter to Santa and the money and manpower will ride to her rescue – again.

There’s even a past present link to the location of the photograph. The site is Summerseats viaduct which was a popular photographic location alongside the East Lancashire Railway between Summerseats and Ramsbottom. However, the site has now become so overgrown that the shot of the locomotives on the viaduct has gone, all that remains is the very tight head on shot. You can just see the viaduct safety rails below the exhaust from No.60163 Tornado.

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