Tag Archives: 45699 Galatea

50 years down the line

Saturday August 11th 2018 and No.45690 Leander  clears Shotlock Tunnel with the re-run of 1T57 aka ‘Waverley’ in real time. No.45690 Leander was one of three engines working over the Settle – Carlisle line on this auspicious occasion. All three were diesel assisted because of the fire hazard brought about by the drought. In this photo the load was being shared in what seemed to be 50 – 50.

By contrast, in this shot of No.45699 Galatea with the ‘up’ Cumbrian Mountain Express, at Birkett common, where No.45699 Galatea was putting in a little more than 50% with matching clag and a feather at the safety valves. And then there was No.60009 Union of South Africa – perhaps the less said the better.Some of you might have noticed Steam Age Daydreams has been missing from Facebook – it will not be returning. Please feel free to let other SADD readers know that in future all updates will appear only here.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Jubilee close up

My previous post, about the proliferation of Jubilees in the Leeds area, drew a number of comments, one of which was, ‘how did they compare with the Black 5s’.  Today I had a flick through the latest Steam Railway, whilst standing in the supermarket, and in the Main Line running feature, Lo’ and behold, was an article  on No.45699 Galatea. I didn’t get chance to read the article, save that it mentioned that No.45699 Galatea had put in an epic performance and the engine she was being compared against wasn’t the Black 5 but a ‘Scot’.

My own work on the Jubilees is such that making a real comparison with the Black 5 is a little unfair. A dozen runs and half of them I was only riding out, while I was still just a cleaner, isn’t exactly ‘experience’. The longest trip I made on one was from Wakefield to Blackpool and back There were crews, at Farnley Jct, who often commented they’d as soon have a Black 5 as a Jubilee.  Having only been a fireman all I can say is that the Black 5 was a more forgiving engine. The Jubilees needed more careful firing, if you got too much fire down the front, under the brick arch, they would go sick on you. And trying to use fire irons, keeping them within the confines of the cab, when you’re on the move, is a risky and tricky business.

When first introduced the Jubilees did have a reputation as indifferent performers; and the level of superheating was considered the culprit.  Time and energy was put into improving their performance and, in 1937, No.(4)5684 Jutland was fitted with a Kylchap double-chimney and blast pipe Despite improvements in coal consumption, it was remved after a year. Several others were fitted with a standard  double-chimney only to have them later removed, a few did keep them though including the preserved No.45596 Bahamas.  However, it was changes to the chimney and blast pipe which were, eventually, credited with improving their steaming capabilities.

And you don’t create epic runs if you’re short of steam.

The photo shows Ex-LMS Jubilee No.(4)5690 Leander pulling away from Loughborough  Central  Station, on the GCR, with a TPO recreation.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Jubes

When I think back to Leeds City Station, in the late 1950s, more than anything I associate it with the ‘Jubilees’.  They have woven in and out of my life ever since. The Jubes came and went from Leeds to all corners of the sprawling LMS. On the Scottish services one would arrive from St.Pancras, in the south, and another would back down  to work the train north to Carlisle and Glasgow. The ones which came in from Birmingham and Bristol would be replaced by a V2 or an A3, if the train was one going forwards to York and Newcastle; a Fairburn or Fowler 2-6-4 tank was the usual motive power, if it was a service which terminated at Bradford Forster Square.

The Newcastle – Liverpools or Hull – Liverpools would run in behind A3s, V2s, B1s, and B16s from the North or East, and depart for Manchester and Liverpool behind a Jube, sometimes double-headed. For a period of several months in 1962 the Jubes working these services, or the famous ‘Red Bank vans’, the returning Manchester – Newcastle paper train, would, if they were Farnley Jct. engines, have been cleaned by yours truly.

In 1962 55C Farnley Jct. had 4 Jubilees on the allocation, 55A Holbeck, however, had no less than 18 and some of that stud remained active to the very end. No.45675  Hardy, No.45694 Bellerophon and  the very last to go, No.45562 Alberta, were all Holbeck engines at the end of the 1950s. No.45562 had been allocated to Holbeck in 1948 and for all but a brief interregnum at – yes, 55C Farnley Jct.  in 1964 / 65, it was where she remained until withdrawn in November 1967: she was cut up at Cashmores in May 1968. No. 45694 Bellerophon, along with another of the Holbeck entourage, No.45739 Ulster were, for a short spell in 1966/7, shedded at 56A Wakefield.  And during this period I worked on No.45694 Bellerophon, taking a ‘Miner’s Welfare’ trip to Blackpool and back, as I mentioned in a previous blog.

The photo shows No.45699 Galatea, a long time Bristol (Barrow Rd.) engine, at the north end of the short Shotlock Tunnel, approaching the summit of Aisgill. She is working the ‘Hadrian’ – Norwich – Carlisle and return.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Waggling signals

Nearing the summit at Aisgill, with the Fellsman, is Ex-LMS Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No.45699 Galatea; she looked and sounded on fine form as she swept round the curves between Lunds viaduct and Shotlock Tunnel. The photo is taken from the top of the tunnel and you can just make out the footbridge, over the line at Lunds, on the left edge.

I was joined on my lofty perch by a chap from Barrow and we passed a pleasant half hour chatting about railways and railwaymen; a conversation which produced a wonderful little anecdote about a spot of ‘on duty’ lubrication for the crew of the Tebay banker.

When he was younger, in the steam era,  he was friendly with some of the crews who worked at Tebay, who told him a tale of ‘after hours’ in, I think he said, the Junction Hotel.  They would cross over the foot bridge, by the shed, and make their way up to the pub and into the back room, which had a large bay window, from which could be seen the very tall signals, at the end of the platform at Tebay Station.

The standing arrangement was that, if an approaching train was in need of a banker, for the climb to Shap summit, the Bobby would waggle the signal arms up and down a couple of times and the crew would down their beer and head for the shed. In the tale, the hapless crew get back on the footplate only to find the fire half dead and not a lot of steam. It goes almost without saying that any banking assistance that was provided was minimal to say the least!

Today any railwayman having a few pints, in such a fashion, and whilst on duty would be sacked – when folk say, ‘it was different back then’, really aren’t kidding.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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