Tag Archives: 45690 Leander

Just steamin’ in the rain

I’m laughing at clouds so dark up above’; more like ‘cryin’ in the rain’, which was, at the time travelling almost horizontally. This is the north bound Waverley, running about 10 late, crossing Dandry Mire viaduct; just north of Garsdale station. The misty spots are rain drops on my UV filter – not a great deal of UV though.

I spent a little over ten minutes standing in this – how those navvies coped, in the seven years this route took to build, I can’t imagine.   Their diet was, reputedly, a gallon of beer and a pound of beef – whatever it was it gave them a constitution of iron to survive up here in all weathers.  The engine was carrying a wreath on the smokebox door – if I’d spent much longer ‘waiting for a train’  – I’d have been ‘stokin’ the boiler on a down bound’ one!

Things did improve for the south bound run – but more on that later.

Some of you might be interested to know that my book, Railway Tales, about my own footplate work during the last years of BR steam, is now available as an ebook here’s the link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Railway-Tales-C-D-Wilson-ebook/dp/B07H38XV1V/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536155603&sr=1-2&keywords=railway+tales+ebook

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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Bringing the cheque ……..

“The cheque’s in the post” – but hopefully not in this demonstation of the TPO on the Great Central Railway, it really would never get there. My first ever shed bash to London, from my home in Leeds, was on what would be described as the ‘mail train’. We left Leeds at around 10:15 and arrived in St. Pancras at about 06:00. The trip was  an advertised excursion; and the cost of the ticket must have been very small, we were all still schoolboys. Like the journey south we had to return on a designated service at around 18:00, as I recall; more than enough time for a trip round the London Termini and trips to Stratford, Old Oak Common, and Willesden sheds.

I say we because I did the trip on several occasions and with different travelling companions. The trips, made during 1960 and 61, also included visits to Kentish Town and a futile attempt to bunk Camden. Surprisingly, in view of my later time on the footplate, we didn’t go ‘south of the river’ during these excursions.  In today’s social climate the very idea of 3 or 4 teenage lads, from a city in northern England would travel to London and spend several hours tresspassing on railway property, would have folk going mental – the tabloid press would have a field day and the PC brigade would have had our parents locked up. My how times change.

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the existing webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Stopped for a blow-up

With nothing better to do yesterday afternoon I watched some steam action videos on Youtube, one of which was titled, “King in trouble”. Part of the action shows the struggle on the footplate as the fireman, aided by a traction inspector, try to maintain boiler pressure.  We see them turning the injectors on and off, both fireman and inspector have a go with the shovel and the fireman gets a fire iron in the fire – a lot of effort but, still the needle seemed stuck around 150lbs sq in.

I’ve had a few rough trips myself, and been brought to a stand with the brakes going on because steam pressure had fallen so low the ejector was no longer maintaining sufficient vacuum to keep them off.  Back in the day, when this happend you had to inform the signalman you’d stopped in section and why. Later the driver would have a No.1 form to complete to explain what went wrong.

Earlier this year the engine in the photo, Ex-LMS Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No.45690 Leander, was taken out of service at Carlisle after working over the Settle – Carlisle and having lost time due to ‘steaming issues’.  In their earliest form the Jubilees did have a reputation as indifferent steamers but, later modifications to the superheater and blast pipe improved matters. However, they never quite lost that ‘indifferent’ tag and in the wrong hands, or with poor coal, they could quickly turn sick, especially if they had to much fire under the brick arch.

Steam Age Daydreams began in 2014 and since then over 600 blogs have appeared on all manner of railway topics.  They are all still available to read in the ‘Archive’ section. I am writing this to let you all know that when the current webhosting contract expires in December there are, currently, no plans to renew it – Steam Age Daydreams will cease.

The book about my lifetime of involvement with matters railway will still be available on Amazon – Below, is the link to it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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50 years down the line

Saturday August 11th 2018 and No.45690 Leander  clears Shotlock Tunnel with the re-run of 1T57 aka ‘Waverley’ in real time. No.45690 Leander was one of three engines working over the Settle – Carlisle line on this auspicious occasion. All three were diesel assisted because of the fire hazard brought about by the drought. In this photo the load was being shared in what seemed to be 50 – 50.

By contrast, in this shot of No.45699 Galatea with the ‘up’ Cumbrian Mountain Express, at Birkett common, where No.45699 Galatea was putting in a little more than 50% with matching clag and a feather at the safety valves. And then there was No.60009 Union of South Africa – perhaps the less said the better.Some of you might have noticed Steam Age Daydreams has been missing from Facebook – it will not be returning. Please feel free to let other SADD readers know that in future all updates will appear only here.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Jubilee close up

My previous post, about the proliferation of Jubilees in the Leeds area, drew a number of comments, one of which was, ‘how did they compare with the Black 5s’.  Today I had a flick through the latest Steam Railway, whilst standing in the supermarket, and in the Main Line running feature, Lo’ and behold, was an article  on No.45699 Galatea. I didn’t get chance to read the article, save that it mentioned that No.45699 Galatea had put in an epic performance and the engine she was being compared against wasn’t the Black 5 but a ‘Scot’.

My own work on the Jubilees is such that making a real comparison with the Black 5 is a little unfair. A dozen runs and half of them I was only riding out, while I was still just a cleaner, isn’t exactly ‘experience’. The longest trip I made on one was from Wakefield to Blackpool and back There were crews, at Farnley Jct, who often commented they’d as soon have a Black 5 as a Jubilee.  Having only been a fireman all I can say is that the Black 5 was a more forgiving engine. The Jubilees needed more careful firing, if you got too much fire down the front, under the brick arch, they would go sick on you. And trying to use fire irons, keeping them within the confines of the cab, when you’re on the move, is a risky and tricky business.

When first introduced the Jubilees did have a reputation as indifferent performers; and the level of superheating was considered the culprit.  Time and energy was put into improving their performance and, in 1937, No.(4)5684 Jutland was fitted with a Kylchap double-chimney and blast pipe Despite improvements in coal consumption, it was remved after a year. Several others were fitted with a standard  double-chimney only to have them later removed, a few did keep them though including the preserved No.45596 Bahamas.  However, it was changes to the chimney and blast pipe which were, eventually, credited with improving their steaming capabilities.

And you don’t create epic runs if you’re short of steam.

The photo shows Ex-LMS Jubilee No.(4)5690 Leander pulling away from Loughborough  Central  Station, on the GCR, with a TPO recreation.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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56 years ago today

56 years ago today I began work with BR, at a shed, where I cleaned and fired engines just like the one in this photo. Unfortunately none of them survived ‘the great purge’. However, one that did survive was a fairly frequent visitor, when she was based at Stockport, No.45596 Bahamas; one of a handful of the Jubilee Class which were fitted with a double chimney.

Like the engine this photograph, No. 45690 Leander, No.45596 Bahamas is soon to be back in action, after lengthy overhaul. Just as some of my very first associations were with the Jubilees so were some of my last. There were very few passenger turns at Wakefield, where I ended my BR service, apart from a few jobs working the Bradford portions of London – Leeds services from Wakefield Westgate to Bradford Exchange, the only others, at the time, were ‘excursions’ for Rugby / Football matches and trips to the seaside.

My very last trip on a Jubilee was with a trip to Blackpool and back with a train load of miners, the details of which were the subject of an earlier post. Sadly, none of the engines I worked on at Farnley and at Wakefield survived, however, a goodly number of those I worked on at Nine Elms did; and a week on Friday I hope to see one of them, No.35018 British India Line, having a run over the S&C. I haven’t seen her in the flesh since she was withdrawn, over 50 years ago – quite looking forward to Friday 20th. My BR days migh have ended in 1968 but my attachment to those dim and distant days did not.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

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Sunday tea on top of Aisgill

Once upon a time, a long, long, time ago I cleaned engines, just like this one, for £3 – 12 – 0, (£3.60p), for a 42.5 hour week. Starting in a new job has its own rituals, being sent on fools errands, or, as happened to one cleaner at Farnley Jct. being put in a wagon and sent off-shed down to Copley Hill Yard. My ‘initiation’ was being shut in the firebox, of an engine on washout, and smoking rags put in the ash pan below me – nice!

Cleaning engines is a mucky job but, there were perks, we got to play aroud on them, moving them about the shed; taking them off the ash pits and putting them in the shed, turning on the triangle, shunting out the washouts and so on – all under supervision of course. There was always stuff going on and, if there wasn’t we got up to no good – water fights with the washout bags was a favourite, baseball with a brake stick and coal eggs was another.

We’d be given a couple of engines to clean and then be told to ‘keep out of the way’ once you’ve done. These were the times you could go off shed, to Copley Hill Yard, with the shed pilot, to take the stores wagon and the ash wagons, returning with fresh supplies of coal and stores. In freezing weather we were kept busy stoking the braziers, to keep the water columns ice free, which was fun. Much like making a 100+ mile round trip, to take photographs of a ‘black’ Jube, at the top of Aisgill, on Sunday tea time.

In the photograph, No.45690 Leander is  seen working the  returning Dalesman from Carlisle to York.

If you have enjoyed my blogs – I have written a book about my 60 years involvement with railways, from trainspotter, via steam age footplateman, to railway author and photographer, this is a link to it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gricing-Real-story-Railway-Children/dp/1514885751

 

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